Military History

Internships with the Cold War International History Project

Summer Semester Application Deadline is 30 March 2019

Nixon's Nuclear Specter - The Secret Alert of 1969, Madman Diplomacy, and the Vietnam War

In their initial effort to end the Vietnam War, Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger attempted to lever concessions from Hanoi at the negotiating table with military force and coercive diplomacy. They backed up their diplomacy toward North Vietnam and the Soviet Union with the Madman Theory of threatening excessive force, which included the specter of nuclear force.

The End of WW II From Japan's Perspective and its Implications for Today

As we observe the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, Shihoko Goto describes the end of war from Japan's perspective. “Japan can be a stronger regional leader by articulating its history as a whole, both as a victim and as an aggressor,” Goto says. 

Did Hiroshima Save Japan From Soviet Occupation?

In the wee hours of Aug. 24, 1945, Soviet long-range bombers would take off from their air base not far from the Far Eastern port of Vladivostok and fly east, across the Sea of Japan, dropping lethal payloads on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. At 5 a.m. that morning, two Soviet regiments would storm their way onshore, followed, in two hours, by a larger force. Within days, two infantry divisions would sweep across northern Hokkaido, cutting the island in half.

Prelude to the Euromissile Crisis

Prelude to the Euromissile Crisis

The Neutron Bomb Affair, the Netherlands, and the "Defeat of the Strangeloves," 1977-1978

Seeking Historical Reconciliation: The U.S. Role in Fostering Relations Between Japan and South Korea

Democratic ideals and cultural exchanges among nations have been seen as effective tools to encourage reconciliation between former adversaries. But that seemingly has not been the case in relations between Japan and South Korea, even if democratic values are shared. Wilson Center Fellow and Waseda University professor Toyomi Asano notes that it is important to share memories of the United States-led process of decolonization after the Japanese Empire’s defeat.

Contested Memories and Reconciliation Challenges: Japan and the Asia-Pacific on the 70th Anniversary of the End of World War II

The eyes and ears of much of Asia will be on Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe when he delivers a speech in August 2015 to commemorate 70 years since the end of World War II. It will undoubtedly be the most scrutinized of Abe’s public addresses to date, a fact that has not escaped the Prime Minister’s Office as experts have been assembled months in advance to advise him on the broader strategy and the appropriate wording for the occasion. 

From Sea Denial to Nuclear Deterrence: India's Quest for a Nuclear Submarine

From Sea Denial to Nuclear Deterrence

India’s Quest for a Nuclear Submarine

Tlatelolco Tested

The Falklands/Malvinas War and Latin America's Nuclear Weapons Free Zone

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