Military History

Tlatelolco Tested

The Falklands/Malvinas War and Latin America's Nuclear Weapons Free Zone

Still Cozy After All These Years

Sixty-five years ago, on June 25, 1950, the Soviet-equipped North Korean army struck south of the 38th parallel. The ensuing three years of seesaw warfare turned much of the Korean Peninsula into ashes: Up to 3 million Koreans were killed or wounded before the two sides signed a cease-fire in July 1953. Millions more were left to pick up pieces of their shattered, divided lives.

The Imagined Arsenal

The Imagined Arsenal

India's Nuclear Decision-Making, 1973-76

The relationship between the May 1974 “peaceful nuclear explosion” (PNE) and India’s later development of a nuclear weapons arsenal and delivery systems has been a subject of much debate. The spectrum of discussion ranges from scholars attributing a strategic vision to the entire early Indian atomic program, to those who argue that the test was inspired primarily by domestic and foreign policy considerations. Yet all discussion has been hampered by a lack of archival evidence.

The Persistent Legacy: Germany's Place in the Nuclear Order

The Persistent Legacy:

Germany's Place in the Nuclear Order

Despite its legal status, Germany has never been an ordinary non-nuclear weapons state. In NPIHP Working Paper #5, Andreas Lutsch explores the historical dimensions of Germany's ambiguous position in the global nuclear order and re-examines Germany's efforts to revise its NATO role as a host for US nuclear weapons. 

Remembering WWII: the 70th Anniversary of Victory

May 2015 marks 70 years since the momentous victory of the allied forces in Europe. Victory was achieved only through enormous sacrifice and global cooperation amongst the allies. The Kennan Institute hosted a panel discussion of U.S.-Soviet partnership during the war. The panel was followed by a reception, sponsored by the Russian Embassy, to launch a month-long exhibit of archival photos that chronicle the U.S.-Soviet war effort.    

Kennan Cable No.7: A Closer look at Russia’s “Hybrid War”

Western observers have fallen into a now familiar parlance for describing Russia’s annexation of Crimea and subsequent invasion of Eastern Ukraine. Frequently termed Russia’s “hybrid war” against Ukraine, it is seen by the West as a threatening precedent—even a likely model—for future conflicts on Russia’s periphery. In this view, a Russian campaign against the Baltic States, Kazakhstan or even Poland might employ a variety of tools, ranging from conventional to irregular combat operations, sponsorship of political protests, economic coercion, and a powerful information campaign.

2015 Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research

Applications are now being accepted for the 2015 Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research.

The Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research (SICAR) is a four-day seminar in which Ph.D. students receive training in conducting archival research from world-class faculty, researchers, archivists, and publishers. Although archival research is an integral part of many academic disciplines, it is virtually never taught at the graduate level. In an effort to address this deficiency, the George Washington University began the Summer Institute in 2003.

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