Military History

Analyzing ‘Operation Inherent Resolve’

Two months after its first airstrikes against Islamic State, Washington has finally named its latest military operation in the Middle East. The delay was curious. Maybe it was hard to come up with a title that embraced the massive but amorphous nature of this novel intervention against Islamic State, an extremist movement (also known as ISIS or ISIL) that has gobbled up vast chunks of Iraq and Syria.

A century after WWI, Russia again imperial

Vladimir Putin and his re-drawing of the map of Ukraine have once again reminded the world of the instability that accompanies imperial thinking. The age of empire collapsed in the aftermath of World War I, but Putin has used the 100th anniversary of the Great War to assert Russia's imperial mission in a decidedly post-colonial world.

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Captive Society: The Basij Militia and Social Control in Iran

Iran’s Organization for the Mobilization of the Oppressed (Sazeman-e Basij-e Mostazafan), commonly known as the Basij, is a paramilitary organization used by the regime to suppress dissidents, vote as a bloc, and indoctrinate Iranian citizens. Captive Society surveys the Basij’s history, structure, and relations with the Revolutionary Guard, as well as it sociology and its roles in Iran’s society, economy, and educational system.

Burning Secrets of the Corfu Channel Incident

CWIHP Working Paper No. 70, “Burning Secrets of the Corfu Channel Incident” offers a fresh look at an October 1946 naval incident off the coast of Albania where two British warships struck mines while navigating the Channel near Albanian territorial waters. Using declassified Albanian documents and recently released British documents “previously unknown to the Albanian public,” Lalaj examines this early episode of the Cold War and subsequent legal case at the International Court of Justice.

From Sarajevo, 1914 to Southeastern Europe, 2014: Wars, Transitions and Controversies

In Balkans into Southeastern Europe, 1914-2014, A Century of War and Transition  (Palgrave, 2014), John Lampe revises and expands his 2006 volume to reconsider the region's full century since the assassination in Sarajevo and the Great War that followed.  Drawing on recent scholarship and addressing recent controversies, he traces the saga of Southeastern Europe from the explosive mixture of Balkan states and imperial borderlands before the First World War, through the trials that their successors faced during two world wars, the Cold War, and finally the wars of Yugoslavia's disso

World War One: What Were They Thinking? Lessons From the Catastrophe

Why did a small number of European statesmen take the world into the seminal catastrophe of the Great War? The German Chancellor Otto Bismarck had warned in 1880 that “some damned foolish thing in the Balkans” might lead to a terrible war. The shots at Sarajevo did just that a hundred years ago. What have we learned?

This event is co-hosted with Thomson Reuters.

Declassified Documents on Korean Armistice Agreement Featured on the Digital Archive

Sixty-one years ago this week, the 1950-53 Korean War ended in an armistice, with neither side legitimately able to claim outright victory. When the armistice was signed on 27 July 1953, talks had already dragged on for more than two years. Issues such as the line of demarcation were agreed upon early in the negotiations by military commanders from North Korea and China on one side, and the United States on the other. Yet, for over a year-and-a-half, talks became ensnared on the exchange of prisoners of war.

Gender Mainstreaming in African Armed Forces

Africa Program Director Dr. Monde Muyangwa recently discussed gender mainstreaming in African armed forces at a Regional Gender Mainstreaming Seminar hosted by the Namibian Defense Force and co-sponsored by US Africa Command and US Army Africa in Windhoek, Namibia from 23-27 June, 2014.

PM Begin writes to Margaret Thatcher in 1979, warning of the threat posed by Pakistan's Nuclear Program

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin writes to Margaret Thatcher in 1979, warning of the threat posed by Pakistan's Nuclear Program

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