Modern Korean History

New South Korean Foreign Ministry Documents Added to Digital Archive

The North Korea International Documentation Project, in cooperation with Kyungnam University, has recently obtained and translated nearly 30 documents from the South Korean Foreign Ministry Archive. The documents reveal how the South Korean leadership perceived and analyzed changes in the US-ROK relationship, the inter-Korean dynamic, and North Korea's engagement with the outside world in the late 1970s, a particularly tumultuous period in which the American security commitment to the Korean Peninsula was continuously questioned.

The 1967 Purge of the Gapsan Faction and Establishment of the Monolithic Ideological System

NKIDP e-Dossier no. 15
The 1967 Purge of the Gapsan Faction and Establishment of the Monolithic Ideological System

Introduced by James F. Person

The Carter Chill: US-ROK-DPRK Trilateral Relations, 1976-1979

A collection of archival documents on inter-Korean, US-ROK and DPRK-Communist bloc relations from 1976 through 1979 compiled in preparation for the 3-4 December 2013 critical oral history conference "The Carter Chill: US-ROK-DPRK Trilateral Relations, 1976-1979." The volume consists of selected documents from archives in the United States, South Korea, (East) Germany, Romania, Hungary, Australia, the United Kingdom, the former Yugoslavia, and the United Nations. The briefing book is organized chronologically,

CANCELLED: The Korean Peninsula Trust-Building Process and ROK-US Relations

 

**DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED**

 

HAPP Digital Archive Wins the 2013 Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History

A project of the Woodrow Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program, “Digital Archive: International History Declassified,” has been selected as the winner of the 2013 Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History. The Rosenzweig Prize is awarded annually in honor and support of work on an innovative and freely available new media project that reflects thoughtful, critical, and rigorous engagement with technology and the practice of history.

North Korea and the 2018 Olympic Games

Following a recent suggestion by North Korea’s member of the International Olympic Committee that the two Korea’s could co-host the 2018 Olympic Games, awarded to South Korea’s Pyeongchang, South Korean officials dismissed the idea as unrealistic. The North Korean official claimed that events could be held at the North’s Masik Ski Resort, one of Kim Jong Un’s prestige projects currently under construction. Given the timing of the resort’s construction, the North’s proposal comes as no surprise, and is not without precedent.

Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea

Sixty years after North Korean troops crossed the 38th parallel into South Korea, the Korean War has not yet ended. Sheila Miyoshi Jager presents the first comprehensive history of this misunderstood war, one that risks involving the world’s superpowers—again. Her sweeping narrative ranges from the middle of the Second World War—when Korean independence was fiercely debated between Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill—to the present day, as North Korea, with China’s aid, stockpiles nuclear weapons while starving its people.

Woodrow Wilson Center and Korean National Assembly Sign MoU

On Thursday, August 1st, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Korean National Assembly to promote collaboration, joint activities, and exchange of scholars. Secretary General Jin Suk Chung and a delegation from the National Assembly visited the Wilson Center for the signing ceremony.   

NKIDP Releases New Collection of Documents on Korean War Armistice

Sixty years ago this week, the 1950-53 Korean War ended in an armistice, with neither side legitimately able to claim outright victory. When the armistice was signed on 27 July 1953, talks had already dragged on for more than two years. Issues such as the line of demarcation were agreed upon early in the negotiations by military commanders from North Korea and China on one side, and the United States on the other. Yet, for over a year-and-a-half, talks became ensnared on the exchange of prisoners of war.

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