NAFTA

Rhetoric Meets Reality at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Immigration and NAFTA in a New Era of Bilateral Relations

On July 1st, Mexican voters took to the polls and issued a call for sweeping change. Andrés Manuel López Obrador won the presidency and, along with its coalition partners, his party won a majority of seats in both houses of Congress. As a result, AMLO, as López Obrador is known, will take office in December with a stronger electoral mandate than any other president in Mexico’s modern, democratic era. Though his commanding victory seems to have impressed U.S. President Donald Trump and the two presidents appear to be in a sort of honeymoon period, the good times are unlikely to last.

Got Milk? Canada and the U.S. Clash Over Dairy

Why is the Trump administration targeting dairy products in its trade dispute with Canada? Benn Proctor, Program Associate with the Wilson Center’s Canada Institute, explains why dairy from north of the border has become such a contentious issue between otherwise friendly neighbors. That’s the focus of this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

Guest

How the Mexico Election Impacts San Diego

San Diego and California have a lot riding on Mexico’s Sunday elections and resulting impacts for U.S.-Mexico relations.

Mexico is California’s top export market with sales of $26.7 billion in 2017, compared to only $7.7 billion in 1994, the first year of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Total U.S.-Mexico trade has multiplied by six under NAFTA. Mexico is the United States’ second largest export market and its third largest trading partner.

Mexico's Elections: A Turning Point for California and the United States?

(The following article is adapted from a series of talks in California given June 25-28)

Mexico has a momentous election on July 1.  Who gets elected and how U.S.-Mexico relations unfold afterwards will have major consequences for California and the United States, as well as Mexico.

Building Partnership with Mexico, A Presentation by Earl Anthony Wayne

Negotiators Must Redouble Efforts as Clock Ticks on NAFTA

After a short cooling off period, the North American Free Trade (NAFTA) negotiators need to redouble efforts to forge an agreement this summer that all three countries find beneficial.

An agreement that preserves and increases the almost 14 million American jobs supported by NAFTA is clearly in the U.S. interest. On June 18, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo provided an optimistic perspective that agreements could be reached “in the coming weeks.”

Hardball Trade Tactics Will Leave U.S. Workers Battered and Bruised

A long-time U.S. trade guru joked last week that as a rule of thumb, he favors trying to manage only one trade war at a time, not multiple trade conflicts at once as the U.S. is attempting.

As the danger of costly missteps and negative consequences with international partners becomes more evident, the United States needs a serious debate over the current approach and making course adjustments. The alternative could leave the U.S. trying to recoup after paying the price at home and abroad.

Infographic | NAFTA 2.0 Trade Progress Update: May 21, 2018

Pages