NAFTA

The New NAFTA: Congratulations in Order, More Dealmaking Ahead

Wilson Center experts are available for interviews. Please contact Ryan McKenna at ryan.mckenna@wilsoncenter.org to schedule. 
 

The Wilson Center’s experts on North America and international trade provide a first-take analysis of the hard-won deal that aims to reshape key aspects of continental commerce:

Laura Dawson, Canada Institute Director

Live on C-SPAN: Laura Dawson and Duncan Wood on NAFTA and North American Relations

Laura Dawson, Director of the Wilson Center's Canada Institute, and Duncan Wood, Director of the Wilson Center's Mexico institute, sat down with C-SPAN to discuss the ongoing NAFTA renegotiation and relations between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. 

WATCH HERE: www.c-span.org/video/?451641-3/washington-journal-laura-dawson-duncan-wood-discuss-nafta-us-canada-mexico-relations&live

Wilson Quarterly Spotlight: NAFTA and Tariffs Beyond the Numbers

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW, we explore the newly released issue of The Wilson Quarterly, “The Grinding Gears of North America,” with the help of editor Richard Solash and contributor Laura Dawson. They discuss how the uncertain fate of NAFTA and President Trump’s trade wars are testing the bonds of the North American continent. 

Nine Million Reasons to Get a Trade Deal Done with Canada

As U.S. and Canadian officials resume trade negotiations in Washington, it is vital to realize that the United States gains massively from its economic relationship with Canada.

Ending the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and moving ahead with only a new U.S.-Mexico trade agreement, as the White House has threatened, would damage the U.S. and Canada. Compared to what is at stake for the United States, the remaining U.S.-Canada trade differences are small and resolvable.

NAFTA 2.0 End Game Briefer

From what we know so far, the prospective deal is not as good as we hoped, but it is not as bad as it could have been. 
 

Are we in the end game for NAFTA?

I would give it a more than 50/50 chance. To be in the end game, two conditions must be met: Canada has to be able to live with the proposals worked out by the U.S. and Mexico over the past five weeks and there must be enough benefits across all sectors of the agreement to provide a landing strip for settlement.

U.S.-Mexico Deal Means Very Little Without Canada

The “preliminary agreement in principle” between Mexico and the United States is an important step forward in the effort to agree on a modernized trade agreement in North America.

It is important to recognize, however, that the bilateral U.S.-Mexico agreement is not a good substitute for a trilateral agreement that brings in Canada, America’s largest trading partner.

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