NAFTA

NAFTA April Update: Spring Fever or Fools Rush in?

I have delayed sending out my regular NAFTA update for a couple of weeks because things are changing so quickly that what seemed clear a  month ago is up in the air today. On one hand, I still believe that no one ever made money betting on the swift conclusion of a trade agreement, but on the other hand, I think it’s fair to say that all parties are at least considering options that may result an agreement in principle, an agreement to agree? Such a decision would take place prior to achieving a substantive conclusion to many of the 32 negotiating chapters under consideration.

Texas Needs a Modernized NAFTA Now

As trade ministers from Mexico, Canada, and the United States sprint to forge an agreement on NAFTA, the case of Texas reminds us of what the United States has at stake.   The “Lone Star State” will lose enormously if the North American Free Trade Agreement ends, and it will gain significantly if an updated NAFTA is agreed upon.

Fifth Annual Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border Conference

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance invite you to our fifth annual high-level "Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border" conference, which will focus on improving border management in order to strenghten the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico. Specific emphasis will be placed on a cooperative bilateral framework, NAFTA, binational economic development, and the need for efforts that simultaneously support security and efficiency in border management.

Agenda

Mexican Presidential Candidate Series: A Conversation with Sergio Alcocer

Please note this event took place at the Atlantic Council.

In just over two months, Mexicans will elect their next president. This election comes at a historic turning point for Mexico and U.S.-Mexico relations. How would a government led by José Antonio Meade navigate NAFTA negotiations and the broader U.S.-Mexico relationship at this pivotal moment?

Trump, Trudeau, and Peña Nieto Cannot Let NAFTA Fail

America urgently needs an immediate breakthrough in the negotiations to modernize the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) before elections in Mexico and the United States close the window for progress until next year. Letting this moment pass could seriously harm U.S. farmers, businesses and workers and add uncertainty to relations with America’s two largest export markets, Canada and Mexico.

Urgently Needing NAFTA Breakthroughs Now

Nebraska depends mightily on its $2.6 billion in trade with Mexico and Canada. Almost half of Nebraska’s agricultural exports and 91,000 jobs rely on that commerce.

What Do Mexicans Think of NAFTA and the United States? New Polling Partnership with Buendía & Laredo

The Mexico Institute is pleased to announce a new partnership with Buendía & Laredo, a polling firm located in Mexico City, Mexico.

The Mexico Institute and Buendía & Laredo will periodically publish polling data on Mexican opinion of the United States, as well as other topics related to the U.S.-Mexico relationship.

This page will be updated with the survey reports and related analysis.

New Polling Data from Mexico: Does Positive Opinion of the U.S. Depend on Progress in NAFTA Talks?

Pacific Nations Leave the U.S. in the Rear-View Mirror on Trade

The contrast could not be greater: the president of the United States signs an order to impose new tariffs on steel and aluminum, which threatens partners and allies, on the same day that the 11 remaining partners of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) sign an agreement to expand trade and establish improved rules governing trade.

Severing NAFTA Ties Harms Much More Than Trade

U.S. ties with Mexico and Canada touch the daily lives of more Americans than ties with any other two countries in the world. Trade, border connections, tourism, family ties and mutual security concerns link us closely, but we are endangering those links and our wellbeing by a contentious modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Now is the time to forge as much agreement as possible before elections in Mexico (July presidential and congressional elections) and the U.S. (November congressional elections) close the political space for agreement.

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