NAFTA

ECSP Report 3: Special Reports

This section highlights the work of various organizations on issues of environmental change and security. This issue includes reports from Ecologic - Centre for International and European Environmental Research, the Master of Science in Foreign Service Program at Georgetown University, and the Natural Heritage Institute.

Whose Logo? Sustainable Consumption and Production in North America

Stefanie Bowles, Policy Horizons Canada

The role of government as a regulating body in certifying green labels and standards is in decline, said Stefanie Bowles at an event hosted by the Canada Institute. Bowles discussed the findings of her research examining the economic and social implications of the steady rise of products claiming to be "green." Bowles' presentation shed light on a changing regulatory structure, the difficulties of defining "green," and the unclear role of government in a consumer-led environment.

Op-ed: How 2011 could be better for Mexico

The Dallas Morning News

No doubt about it, 2010 was not a good year for Mexico. After setting new records for cartel-related violence, it’s hard to imagine 2011 could be much worse. While reversing this trend will be extremely difficult, here are three things the Mexican and U.S. governments can do to help make this a better year for Mexico and, by extension, the United States.

Does North America Exist? Governing the Continent after NAFTA and 9/11

In the wake of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, renowned public intellectual and scholar Stephen Clarkson asks whether North America “exists” in the sense that the European Union has made Europe exist. Clarkson’s rigorous study of the many political and economic relationships that link Canada, the United States, and Mexico answers this unusual question by looking at the institutions created by NAFTA, a broad selection of economic sectors, and the security policies put in place by the three neighboring countries following 9/11.

Dispersed Relations: Americans and Canadians in Upper North America

Although they sometimes seem to be engaged in a single, wildly imbalanced relationship, the United States and Canada actually share interwoven connections through a host of regional, cultural, social, economic, and even political communities that form an American-Canadian interdependence, according to Reginald C. Stuart.

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