Nuclear History | Wilson Center

Nuclear History

2010 NPIHP Fellow Mattia Toaldo

The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project is pleased to welcome Mattia Toaldo to the project as a 2010 NPIHP Fellow.

Toaldo is based at the University of Roma Tre in Rome, Italy where his research focuses upon the differing US and Israeli approaches to nuclear proliferation in the Middle East.

New book by NPIHP Partner Matias Spektor

The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project (NPIHP) is pleased to announce the publication of Azeredo da Silveira: um Depoimento (Azeredo da Silveira: A Testimony) edited by Matias Spektor. One of Brazil's most influential diplomats, Silveira's tenure as foreign minister from 1974-1979 marked a reorientation of Brazil's foreign policy as well as a new assertiveness in the nuclear realm.

Announcing NPIHP Fellow Giordana Pulcini

The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project is pleased to welcome Giordana Pulcini to the project as a 2010 NPIHP Fellow.

Pulcini's research centers upon the relationship between US strategic arms control policy and the rise of the neoconservative movement in the US in the 1970s and 1980s.

NPIHP Partner Anna-Mart van Wyk published in LSE <i>IDEAS</i>

An article by Nuclear Proliferation International History Project partner Anna-Mart van Wyk was the cover story in the most recent edition of LSE's journal IDEAS.

New Documents from Dutch Archives

CWIHP is pleased to announce the publication of e-Dossier #21, "A mass psychotic movement washing over the country like a wave": Explaining Dutch Reservations About NATO's 1979 Dual-Track Decision, by University of Amsterdam Professor Ruud van Dijk.

International Conference: The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987

CWIHP is pleased to announce the international conference The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987, organized by the Machiavelli Center for Cold War Studies (CIMA), the Craxi Foundation, CWIHP, the George Washington University's National Security Archive, and the Universities of Paris I (Pantheon Sorbonne) and Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), in cooperation with Bundeskanzler Willy Brandt Stiftung.

Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities

This study presents an account of why nuclear weapons are rapidly becoming less attractive than they once seemed and what factors can motivate a country's leaders to keep nuclear ambitions in check. Written by an arms control expert, Bridled Ambition explains how nine countries—South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, India, Pakistan and North Korea—have recently capped, curtailed, or rolled back their nuclear weapons programmes. Among the issues discussed how, when, where and why South Africa built the bomb, how they planned to use it and why they gave it up.

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