Nuclear History

The Imagined Arsenal

The Imagined Arsenal

India's Nuclear Decision-Making, 1973-76

The relationship between the May 1974 “peaceful nuclear explosion” (PNE) and India’s later development of a nuclear weapons arsenal and delivery systems has been a subject of much debate. The spectrum of discussion ranges from scholars attributing a strategic vision to the entire early Indian atomic program, to those who argue that the test was inspired primarily by domestic and foreign policy considerations. Yet all discussion has been hampered by a lack of archival evidence.

The Persistent Legacy: Germany's Place in the Nuclear Order

The Persistent Legacy:

Germany's Place in the Nuclear Order

Despite its legal status, Germany has never been an ordinary non-nuclear weapons state. In NPIHP Working Paper #5, Andreas Lutsch explores the historical dimensions of Germany's ambiguous position in the global nuclear order and re-examines Germany's efforts to revise its NATO role as a host for US nuclear weapons. 

The US Discovery of Israel's Secret Nuclear Project

  • Israeli Cover Stories about the Dimona Reactor Dismayed Top Level Officials Who Saw a "Clearly Apparent Lack of Candor"

  • U.S. Embassy Telegram Quotes Ben-Gurion Aide That It Was a "Stupid Mistake" by Israel to Cloak the Nuclear Project in Secrecy

  • To Prevent Military Uses of the Facility, U.S. Officials Believed the International Atomic Energy Agency Should Monitor Dimona (It Never Has)

Increasing Transparency at the IAEA Archives

Increasing Transparency at the IAEA Archives

3 March 2015

Anna Weichselbraun proposes 9 ways that the IAEA can increase transparency and build confidence in its authority by reforming archival access policies.

NPIHP researchers awarded Newton Advanced Fellowship

Dr. Carlo Patti, Assistant Professor at Universidade Federal de Goiás (Brazil) and Dr. Benoît Pelopidas, lecturer in International Relations at the University of Bristol, have been awarded a British Academy Newton Advanced Fellowship. It will allow them to co-lead a collaborative two-year research project with on "Global Nuclear Vulnerability: the effects of the Cuban Missile Crisis on British, French and Brazilian nuclear policies."
 

Exploring Nuclear Latency

Report of a Workshop on Nuclear Latency

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Washington D.C. | October 2, 2014

Joseph F. Pilat, Los Alamos National Laboratory[1]

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