Nuclear Proliferation/Non-proliferation | Wilson Center

Nuclear Proliferation/Non-proliferation

Robert Litwak on the North Korean and Iranian Nuclear Programs

Vice President for Scholars and Director of International Security Studies Robert S. Litwak is quoted extensively in a piece on Deutsche Welle. As the United States eases sanctions on Iran, pressure on Pyongyang and its nuclear program is increasing. Litwak examines the two cases, and attempts to explain apparent success in one with ineffectiveness in the other.

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The Case for a Two-Track U.S. Approach to North Korea

The U.S.-Iran prisoner exchange, on the heels of Iran’s capture and release of U.S. sailors  last week, overshadowed news about North Korea, a country that, at least in the short term, poses a far graver threat to the U.S.

Deciphering Iran’s Prisoner Swap and Broader Communication

Washington Post correspondent Jason Rezaian and other U.S. citizens have left Iran, capping a week of significant news as well as significant developments in bilateral relations.

Release of U.S. Sailors Is a Win for Rouhani and Iran’s Moderates

The prompt release of the 10 U.S. Navy personnel captured Tuesday by Iran’s military shows that, finally, more sensible counsels are prevailing in Tehran. The early description of the Americans as “prisoners” and their mission as “snooping” was quickly abandoned. This is a victory for President Hassan Rouhani, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, and other moderates. It appears that Mr.

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Did North Korea Detonate a Hydrogen Bomb?

Nuclear proliferation expert Robert Litwak analyzes North Korea’s claim that it successfully detonated a hydrogen bomb.

For the U.S., Few Options to Address North Korea’s Nuclear Program

North Korea’s claim that it has tested a hydrogen bomb produces another major foreign policy challenge for the Obama administration, which has few means to address it. The issue will bedevil the next president (whoever he or she is); it also points up some interesting contrasts with Iran and how the international community has reacted to the two countries’ nuclear programs

Worst-case scenarios that are more likely than you think

The likelihood that a Russian charter airplane, Metrojet 9268, was felled by a bomb after leaving Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, highlights how many national security stories we may be missing — stories that pose at least as much of a threat to the United States as the development of an Iranian nuclear weapon.

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Arms Control in Cyberspace?

U.S. policymakers have compared the challenge of managing threats in the cyber domain to that of controlling nuclear weapons during the Cold War. The United States and China are currently negotiating what would be the first cyber arms control agreement to ban attacks on each other’s critical infrastructure in peacetime. The Obama administration believes such an agreement could lead to a broader “international framework” of norms, treaties, and institutions to govern cyberspace.

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