Nuclear Proliferation/Non-proliferation

Committed: U.S. Foreign Policy in Asia and Completing the Rebalance

The United States is a Pacific power. It may be so reluctantly, but its continued military, political, and economic engagement has been key to Asia’s stability and prosperity. Ensuring that the Asia-Pacific remains robust politically and economically will be in the United States’ own interest, and will be a key foreign policy challenge for any administration.

On NK, freeze can be layover to denuclearization

North Korea tested a fifth nuclear device in violation of the United Nations Security Council resolutions. Held on the sixty-eighth anniversary of the regime's founding, the test comes fresh on the heels of a series of ballistic missile tests on Monday as world powers gathered for a G20 meeting in China. North Korea advances its threat capabilities with each nuclear and ballistic missile test. It is time for an immediate re-assessment of ongoing efforts to eliminate the threat North Korea's weapons programs pose to the region.
 

One Year After Nuclear Deal, Iran’s Rights Violations and Regional Aggression Continue

A year after ​world powers signed an agreement on Iran’s nuclear program, the regime in Tehran continues to engage in developing ballistic missile technology, human rights violations, aggressive behavior in the region, and anti-American and anti-semitic rhetoric.

A Year On, Iran’s Nuclear Deal is Helping its Economy, but not as Much as Some Hoped

Iran’s economy has slowly but measurably rebounded in the year since Tehran signed a historic nuclear deal with the world’s six major powers. The two most tangible changes have been the increase in oil exports–which have nearly doubled since sanctions were lifted on Jan. 16–and the dozens of foreign trade and investment deals Iran has negotiated.

One Year On, How’s The Iran Nuke Deal Doing?

The nuclear deal, signed in July 2015, has been a game changer for Iran.

How to Put North Korea's Nukes on Ice

Pyongyang's version of YouTube recently featured a computer-animated clip of a nuclear strike on Washington delivered via a North Korean ICBM. The North, which a decade ago tested its first nuclear weapon, will soon cross another threshold that could make its video propaganda a genuine threat: It will be able to attack the U.S. homeland with nuclear-tipped long-range ballistic missiles.

Kennedy, Dimona and the Nuclear Proliferation Problem: 1961-1962

Kennedy, Dimona and the Nuclear Proliferation Problem: 1961-1962

by Avner Cohen and William Burr

 

Apply to the Asia-Pacific Nuclear History Institute

Asia-Pacific Nuclear History Institute

Seoul, Korea

March 4–10, 2018

Applications are due no later than October 15th, 2017at 23:59 EST.

The continued proliferation of nuclear weapons is one of the most pressing security issues of our time. A deeper knowledge of the past can improve how we approach the nuclear challenges of today and tomorrow.

The Nuclear Threat: Getting Better or Worse?

Description

Nuclear Security Summit 2016 was recently convened in Washington, DC. Prior to the event, the Wilson Center gathered a high-level panel of experts to focus on the threat posed by nuclear weapons and the proliferation of nuclear technology. Is the global security equation getting better or getting worse? That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

 

Speakers (listed in order of appearance)

Chinese and U.S. Nuclear Strategies in a New Era of Great Power Competition

U.S. nuclear policy toward China is under review as China expands and modernizes its nuclear force.  Hear three leading experts discuss China's view of the U.S. nuclear threat, the implications of China's nuclear modernization for U.S. nuclear strategy, and the prospects for nuclear escalation that could be created by conventional warfare in Northeast Asia.

The papers discussed during this program were made possible by a two-year project funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

 

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