Nuclear Proliferation/Non-proliferation

Moderation in Iran? Don't get your hopes up.

Iranians go to the polls Friday to elect a new parliament and Assembly of Experts, the body that — at least on paper — chooses the next supreme leader. The world is watching to see if the reformist camp will gain ground, but expectations aren't high.

The Key to Nuclear Restraint

Sweden's Plans to Acquire Nuclear Weapons During the Cold War

Why have some nations acquired nuclear weapons while others have refrained? In this seminar, Dr. Thomas Jonter will analyze Sweden’s Cold War plans to acquire nuclear weapons and explore why some states choose restraint.

How the Kurds Became Syria’s New Power Brokers

Tal Rifaat, Menagh air base, Kefir Naya, Kefir Neris — town after town, village after village is falling to Kurdish-led forces as they blaze their way across northern Syria. The latest push by the U.S.-backed group known as the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) marks an explosive new phase in Syria’s five-year war.

On North Korea, US Policymakers Misunderstand the History Between Beijing and Pyongyang

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, faced with North Korea’s claim to have tested a hydrogen bomb, complained to his Chinese counterpart that China’s strategy toward North Korea “has not worked, and we cannot continue business as usual.” In the wake of last week’s missile launch, presidential candidates from both parties called on China to do more. But American observers may have exaggerated the docility of North Korea toward China from the beginning, according to the diplomatic record of Sino-North Korean relations during the Cold War.

The Cold War, the developing world, and the creation of the IAEA

NPIHP Fellow Elisabeth Roehrlich writes in Cold War History about the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Roehrlich examines the early negotiations behind the founding of the IAEA  and the broad coalition of countries that participated in drafting the IAEA Statute.

Inside the Iran Negotiations: A Conversation with Chief Negotiator Wendy Sherman

What was it like to be inside the room during the roller coaster saga of the historic nuclear deal with Iran? What role did personal relationships and domestic politics play in this landmark accord? What were the key moments that made success possible or could have threatened the deal? And what lessons can be learned from U.S.-Iranian negotiations?

Join us for an extraordinary event as Chief U.S. Negotiator Ambassador Wendy Sherman takes us inside the room for an intimate look at the personalities, politics and negotiating dynamics that defined the nuclear agreement. 

Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz on Iran's Nuclear Agreement

The International Atomic Agency (IAEA) has certified that Iran has curbed its nuclear program by taking a number of steps including dismantling two-thirds of its installed centrifuge capacity, reducing its stockpile of enriched uranium and removing the core of its Arak heavy water reactor. As a result, the U.S. has lifted nuclear-related sanctions. 

Robert Litwak on the North Korean and Iranian Nuclear Programs

Vice President for Scholars and Director of International Security Studies Robert S. Litwak is quoted extensively in a piece on Deutsche Welle. As the United States eases sanctions on Iran, pressure on Pyongyang and its nuclear program is increasing. Litwak examines the two cases, and attempts to explain apparent success in one with ineffectiveness in the other.

To read the full article, please click here.

The Case for a Two-Track U.S. Approach to North Korea

The U.S.-Iran prisoner exchange, on the heels of Iran’s capture and release of U.S. sailors  last week, overshadowed news about North Korea, a country that, at least in the short term, poses a far graver threat to the U.S.

Deciphering Iran’s Prisoner Swap and Broader Communication

Washington Post correspondent Jason Rezaian and other U.S. citizens have left Iran, capping a week of significant news as well as significant developments in bilateral relations.

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