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Nuclear Weapons

Transformation or Transaction: Can the US Solve the Nuclear Crises with Iran and North Korea?

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Robert Litwak, author of the new book,Nuclear Crises with North Korea and Iran: From Transformational to Transactional Diplomacy.” Litwak explains how the ongoing nuclear impasses with both North Korea and Iran reflect a continuing tension in U.S.

Nuclear Weapons and Their Pride of Place in North Korea

Visiting my colleague Van Jackson’s office in New Zealand last week, I spotted a classic North Korean souvenir on his shelf: commemorative stamps, packaged as a booklet and sold to the tourist who brought it back for him as a gift last year. These stamps are not of the iconic Juche Tower or the Arch of Triumph (which every North Korean will point out is taller than its counterpart in Paris).

Double Jeopardy: Combating Nuclear Terror and Climate Change

As the consequences of climate change grow ever more dire, it seems imperative that we use every alternative to carbon-based fuels—but does this include nuclear energy? 
 

Q&A: Can North Korea and the U.S. strike a nuclear deal?

This article is part of the World Economic Forum's Geostrategy platform

After two high-profile summits between President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, both sides still appear to be far apart on the issue of nuclear disarmament. Have the talks reached stalemate, and what is the significance of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent state visit to Pyongyang? Is there still hope of a successful agreement?

Flash Analysis: Chinese President Xi Jinping's Visit to North Korea

On June 20th, Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to make a two day state visit to North Korea.  While Kim Jong Un has traveled to China several times over the last year, this will be Xi's first trip to Pyongyang.  Three Wilson Center experts offer their analysis of the implications and potential outcomes.

 

Jean H. Lee, director of the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy:

North Korea: What Everyone Needs To Know

After a year of trading colorful barbs with the American president and significant achievements in North Korea's decades-long nuclear and missile development programs, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared mission accomplished in November 2017. Though Kim's pronouncement appears premature, North Korea is on the verge of being able to strike the United States with nuclear weapons. South Korea has long been in the North Korean crosshairs but worries whether the United States would defend it if North Korea holds the American homeland at risk.

Nuclear Proliferation International History Project's (NPIHP) Nuclear History Boot Camp

Aimed at building a new generation of experts on the international history of nuclear weapons, the ninth-annual Nuclear History Boot Camp is an initiative of the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project (NPIHP). The continued proliferation of nuclear weapons is one of the most pressing security issues of our time.

Geopolitical Implications of a New Era on the Korean Peninsula

The second summit meeting between the United States and the DPRK in Vietnam ended without a deal.
 
There is yet no roadmap on how denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula might be possible, nor is there a clear way for North Korea to be able to join the fold of the international community and have sanctions lifted. In short, a great number of uncertainties remain while hopes for peace continue to be strong.
 

Where Does It Stand and Where Should It Shift? A South Korean Perspective on North Korea Nuclear Diplomacy

It’s the Economy, Stupid! A South Korean Version?

Politics in South Korea show a great deal of similarities with those of the United States. President Moon Jae-in has to confront the polarization of political parties and the press. The conservative opposition party is busy criticizing Moon for being weak on North Korea. The mainstream media is wasting no time in underscoring any sign of disagreements between Washington and Seoul.

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