Nuclear Weapons

Atoms for Peace: A Future after Fifty Years?

On December 8, 1953, President Dwight Eisenhower proposed in a speech to the United Nations that nuclear nonproliferation be promoted by offering peaceful nuclear technology to countries that would renounce nuclear weapons. Today the value of that basic trade-off—atoms for peace—is in question, along with the institutions that embody it. Deployment of weapons by India and Pakistan, noncompliance with safeguards by North Korea and Iran, and the threat of nuclear terrorism have weakened the image of the Nonproliferation Treaty.

Rabin and Israel's National Security

For more than forty years, Yitzhak Rabin played a critical role in shaping Israeli national security policy and military doctrine. He began as a soldier in the Palmach, the elite underground unit of the Jewish community in Palestine, served in the 1948 War of Independence, and ultimately became chief of staff of the Israel Defense Force (IDF), defense minister in several governments, ambassador to the United States, and, twice, prime minister. As chief of staff, Rabin led the IDF to its triumph in the 1967 Six Day War.

Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities

This study presents an account of why nuclear weapons are rapidly becoming less attractive than they once seemed and what factors can motivate a country's leaders to keep nuclear ambitions in check. Written by an arms control expert, Bridled Ambition explains how nine countries—South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, India, Pakistan and North Korea—have recently capped, curtailed, or rolled back their nuclear weapons programmes. Among the issues discussed how, when, where and why South Africa built the bomb, how they planned to use it and why they gave it up.

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