Nuclear Weapons | Wilson Center

Nuclear Weapons

NPIHP Nuclear Boot Camp Twice Featured in Italian Daily Il Messaggero

NPIHP's summer 2011 Nuclear Boot Camp has been featured twice in the past week in the leading Italian daily Il Messaggero Convened north of Rome in the village of Allumiere, Italy, the Nuclear Boot Camp is one part of NPIHP's multi-year global effort to build a new generation of experts on the history of nuclear weapons.

NKIDP Coordinator James Person was interviewed by the Korean newspaper <i>Focus</i>

NKIDP Coordinator James Person was interviewed by the Korean newspaper Focus on March 29, 2011. In the interview James Person suggested that based upon his research, Washington's reliance on Beijing to resolve the North Korean nuclear crisis is a result of America's failure to understand North Korea. Person further noted that extensive research drawing upon primary source documents from archives around the world provides an important and necessary window into North Korea's historical security concerns.

NPIHP Partner Dima Adamsky Publishes Response in Foreign Affairs

Writing in Foreign Affairs, NPIHP partner Dima Adamsky explores a variety of possible Israeli responses to the advent of a nuclear armed Iran.

New Documents from Dutch Archives

CWIHP is pleased to announce the publication of e-Dossier #21, "A mass psychotic movement washing over the country like a wave": Explaining Dutch Reservations About NATO's 1979 Dual-Track Decision, by University of Amsterdam Professor Ruud van Dijk.

International Conference: The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987

CWIHP is pleased to announce the international conference The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987, organized by the Machiavelli Center for Cold War Studies (CIMA), the Craxi Foundation, CWIHP, the George Washington University's National Security Archive, and the Universities of Paris I (Pantheon Sorbonne) and Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), in cooperation with Bundeskanzler Willy Brandt Stiftung.

The Japan-U.S. Partnership Toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons

This summary of the Japan-U.S. Joint Public Policy Forum, held in Tokyo in October 2009, discusses the U.S.-Japan bilateral alliance and issues relating to non-proliferation and moving toward a world free of nuclear weapons. The Forum was co-sponsored by the Wilson Center’s Asia Program and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation. This report includes transcripts of keynote speeches by Japan’s former Permanent Representative to the United Nations Yukio Satoh and the former U.S. Secretary of Defense William J. Perry.

Two Suns in the Heavens: The Sino-Soviet Struggle for Supremacy, 1962–1967

Using newly available archival sources, Two Suns in the Heavens examines the dramatic deterioration of relations between the USSR and China in the 1960s, whereby once powerful allies became estranged, competitive, and increasingly hostile neighbors.

Atoms for Peace: A Future after Fifty Years?

On December 8, 1953, President Dwight Eisenhower proposed in a speech to the United Nations that nuclear nonproliferation be promoted by offering peaceful nuclear technology to countries that would renounce nuclear weapons. Today the value of that basic trade-off—atoms for peace—is in question, along with the institutions that embody it. Deployment of weapons by India and Pakistan, noncompliance with safeguards by North Korea and Iran, and the threat of nuclear terrorism have weakened the image of the Nonproliferation Treaty.

Rabin and Israel's National Security

For more than forty years, Yitzhak Rabin played a critical role in shaping Israeli national security policy and military doctrine. He began as a soldier in the Palmach, the elite underground unit of the Jewish community in Palestine, served in the 1948 War of Independence, and ultimately became chief of staff of the Israel Defense Force (IDF), defense minister in several governments, ambassador to the United States, and, twice, prime minister. As chief of staff, Rabin led the IDF to its triumph in the 1967 Six Day War.

Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities

This study presents an account of why nuclear weapons are rapidly becoming less attractive than they once seemed and what factors can motivate a country's leaders to keep nuclear ambitions in check. Written by an arms control expert, Bridled Ambition explains how nine countries—South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, India, Pakistan and North Korea—have recently capped, curtailed, or rolled back their nuclear weapons programmes. Among the issues discussed how, when, where and why South Africa built the bomb, how they planned to use it and why they gave it up.

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