Nuclear Weapons

One Year After Nuclear Deal, Iran’s Rights Violations and Regional Aggression Continue

A year after ​world powers signed an agreement on Iran’s nuclear program, the regime in Tehran continues to engage in developing ballistic missile technology, human rights violations, aggressive behavior in the region, and anti-American and anti-semitic rhetoric.

A Year On, Iran’s Nuclear Deal is Helping its Economy, but not as Much as Some Hoped

Iran’s economy has slowly but measurably rebounded in the year since Tehran signed a historic nuclear deal with the world’s six major powers. The two most tangible changes have been the increase in oil exports–which have nearly doubled since sanctions were lifted on Jan. 16–and the dozens of foreign trade and investment deals Iran has negotiated.

Reappraising Extended Deterrence

How should the US manage its alliances? Should the US establish a multilateral nuclear policy dialogue in Asia? What capabilities might reassure European allies in light of current Russian revisionism? Do nuclear weapons strengthen these alliances, or do they introduce a divisive bone of contention?

One Year On, How’s The Iran Nuke Deal Doing?

The nuclear deal, signed in July 2015, has been a game changer for Iran.

Kennedy, Dimona and the Nuclear Proliferation Problem: 1961-1962

Kennedy, Dimona and the Nuclear Proliferation Problem: 1961-1962

by Avner Cohen and William Burr

 

Apply to the Asia-Pacific Nuclear History Institute

Asia-Pacific Nuclear History Institute

Seoul, Korea

March 4–10, 2018

Applications are due no later than October 15th, 2017at 23:59 EST.

The continued proliferation of nuclear weapons is one of the most pressing security issues of our time. A deeper knowledge of the past can improve how we approach the nuclear challenges of today and tomorrow.

The Nuclear Threat: Getting Better or Worse?

Description

Nuclear Security Summit 2016 was recently convened in Washington, DC. Prior to the event, the Wilson Center gathered a high-level panel of experts to focus on the threat posed by nuclear weapons and the proliferation of nuclear technology. Is the global security equation getting better or getting worse? That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

 

Speakers (listed in order of appearance)

Chinese and U.S. Nuclear Strategies in a New Era of Great Power Competition

U.S. nuclear policy toward China is under review as China expands and modernizes its nuclear force.  Hear three leading experts discuss China's view of the U.S. nuclear threat, the implications of China's nuclear modernization for U.S. nuclear strategy, and the prospects for nuclear escalation that could be created by conventional warfare in Northeast Asia.

The papers discussed during this program were made possible by a two-year project funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

 

James Person on Sino-North Korean Relations and the Role of US Sanctions

Deputy Director for the History and Public Policy Program James Person was interviewed by Newsweek for an article about the state of US-North Korean negotiations.

The Nuclear Summit and Beyond: Progress or Regress?

In a landmark speech in Prague in April 2009, President Obama laid out a bold agenda to move toward a nuclear-free world. Over the next seven years, his Administration reached a treaty with Russia to reduce strategic arm stockpiles, convened international summits to secure nuclear materials against transfer or theft, and concluded an historic nuclear agreement with Iran.

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