Nuclear Weapons

Internships with the Cold War International History Project

Fall Semester Application Deadline is 15 July 2018

Program Intern (Cold War History)

Call Number: WC-CWIHP-FA2017-I-18
 

Background

The Cold War International History Project (CWIHP) at the Woodrow Wilson Center accepts internship applications throughout the year. The summer semester deadline in 30 March, the fall semester deadline is 15 July, and the spring semester deadline is 15 November.

Arms Control in Cyberspace?

U.S. policymakers have compared the challenge of managing threats in the cyber domain to that of controlling nuclear weapons during the Cold War. The United States and China are currently negotiating what would be the first cyber arms control agreement to ban attacks on each other’s critical infrastructure in peacetime. The Obama administration believes such an agreement could lead to a broader “international framework” of norms, treaties, and institutions to govern cyberspace.

Betting on the Reform and the Reformers in Iran

The Obama administration, including the president himself, has made much of the fact that even if Iran doesn’t change its behavior at home (or in the region), the nuclear agreement is nonetheless a worthwhile enterprise. There is a compelling logic to the president’s argument — an unreformed Iran with a nuclear weapon is much more dangerous than an Iran without one.

Iran’s Nuclear Chess Continued: Reviewing The Deal

Robert Litwak, an internationally recognized expert on nonproliferation, has been following the saga of Iran’s nuclear program since the beginning. His insightful book, “Iran’s Nuclear Chess,” has been updated now that a deal has been struck. We spoke with him about the latest developments, and in reviewing the deal, he covers fears and hopes on both sides of the equation. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

The Different Challenges Facing Obama and Iran’s Khamenei

President Barack Obama and Ayatollah Ali Khamenei face different challenges in the aftermath of the recent agreement reached over Iran’s nuclear program.

In the U.S., the Iran nuclear issue is a proxy for a more fundamental debate about how to address the threat posed by “rogue” states. That’s part of the reason the accord over Iran’s nuclear program was hailed by supporters as a milestone and a historic chance, while opponents criticized it as an act of appeasement and a historic mistake.

The Inter-Church Peace Council and the Nuclear Arms Race

The Origins of the IKV's Campaign Against Nuclear Arms, 1975-77

In June 1977, protests from lawmakers, national security experts, and activists arose almost instantly in response to US plans to produce enhanced radiation weapons (neutron bombs). It was a seemingly sudden beginning to what was, in hindsight, a decade of widespread Western resistance to the nuclear arms race and NATO’s modernization plans. In truth, the eruption of resistance was less sudden than it appeared at the time.

Iran's Nuclear Chess: After the Deal

"Iran's Nuclear Chess: After the Deal," the updated edition of the monograph "Iran's Nuclear Chess: Calculating America's Moves," by Robert Litwak, vice president for scholars and director of international security studies at the Wilson Center, addresses the nuclear agreement between the P5+1 and Iran and assesses its terms and prospective implementation, as well as the implications should the agreement not be implemented.

 

Iran’s Nuclear Chess: After the Deal

“Iran’s Nuclear Chess: After the Deal,” the updated edition of the monograph “Iran’s Nuclear Chess: Calculating America’s Moves,” by Robert Litwak, vice president for scholars and director of international security studies at the Wilson Center, addresses the nuclear agreement between the P5+1 and Iran and assesses its terms and prospective implementation, as well as the implications should the agreement not be implemented.

Iran’s Nuclear Chess: After the Deal

Robert Litwak, author of “Iran’s Nuclear Chess: After the Deal,” assessed the terms and prospective implementation of the nuclear agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1.

Fellowship and Internship Opportunities with NPIHP

Fellowship Opportunities

NPIHP regularly awards research fellowships to junior and mid-career scholars interested in conducting research in non-US archives. Most appointments last between three and six months, and include reimbursement of travel to/from the research site, a modest living stipend, and reimbursement of any duplication costs. Calls for applications will be posted on this page and advertised through the NPIHP mailing list.

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