Old-age Security | Wilson Center

Old-age Security

Police Reform and Corruption in Russia

Vladimir Sergevnin, Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration and Director, Center for Applied Criminal Justice, Western Illinois University; and Editor, Law Enforcement Executive Forum, will address one of the critical issues of modern law enforcement segment of the Russian state: does police reform produce a new paradigm in controlling misconduct and corruption? What are some of the first results in reforming Russian police towards more accountability and professionalism?

Beyond Our Means: Why America Spends While the World Saves

If the financial crisis has taught us anything, it is that Americans save too little, spend too much, and borrow excessively. What can we learn from East Asian and European countries that have fostered enduring cultures of thrift over the past two centuries?  Many economists believe people save according to universally rational calculations, saving the most in their middle years as they plan for retirement, and saving the least in welfare states. In reality, Europeans save at high rates despite generous welfare programs and aging populations.

Women, Migration and the Work of Care: The United States in Comparative Perspective

Native-born American workers are not meeting current U.S. demands for care workers, whether for children, the elderly, or those with chronic illnesses. As a result, there are significant opportunities for migrant workers--opportunities to which women from many parts of the globe are responding. But because U.S. immigration quotas are not in synch with these needs, many potential care workers are entering the country without documentation. Temporary care work programs--though not unproblematic--may be the answer.

Dividend or Deficit? The Economic Effects of Population Age Structure

According to the latest projections, the global population will hit the seven billion mark later this year and perhaps nine billion by 2050. Yet, while the global population is growing, it is also aging, due to falling fertility rates and longer life expectancies. By 2050 the number of people aged 60 and over will reach two billion.

Japan's Declining Population: Clearly a Problem, But What's the Solution?

The four experts who spoke at an April 24 Asia Program seminar on Japan's declining population agreed that the problem was multidimensional: Japanese men continue to face the pressures of long hours at work, and are increasingly reluctant to marry; women are choosing to marry later, have less children, or not marry at all; the government has rejected immigration as a solution to replenish a declining population; and official policy is instead looking to technology, mainly in the form of humanoid robots, to resolve the declining population problem.

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