Organized Crime

The Act of Disappearing in Mexico

In Mexico today, an individual vanishes – a daughter walking home from school, a husband returning from work, a young man out with his friends for the night – and no one seems to care. Their loved ones file the requisite paperwork, asking for an investigation, but no one else has noticed. This experience is multiplied by tens of thousands as the country recently surpassed 30,000 missing people, not to mention the more than 100,000 dead, since the Drug War was declared in 2006. How did disappearing become normal?

Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

The rapid growth of organized crime in Mexico and the government's response to it have driven an unprecedented rise in violence and impelled major structural economic changes, including the recent passage of energy reform. Los Zetas Inc. asserts that these phenomena are a direct and intended result of the emergence of the brutal Zetas criminal organization in the Mexican border state of Tamaulipas.

Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

Los Zetas where once Mexico's most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies. 

Taking Stock of Mexico's Security Landscape

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute invites you to attend its fifth annual Mexican security review. The forum will provide a careful examination of security challenges in Mexico, featuring presentations from leading policy analysts, including David Shirk, Viridiana Rios, Matthew Ingram, and others. Of particular interest will be a review of 2017 and a discussion of trends in 2018, including establishing new bonds in U.S.-Mexico military-to-military relations and strengthening the rule of law in Mexico.

'Examining the Effectiveness of the Kingpin Designation Act in the Western Hemisphere': Eric Olson Testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere

On November 8, 2017, Eric L. Olson, Deputy Director of the Latin American Program and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, testified before the Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. He discussed the effectiveness of the Kingpin Designation Act of 1999 to fight organized crime networks and illicit financing in the Western Hemisphere.

The War on Drugs: The Narco States of North America

Too many Americans are dying from trafficked illegal drugs, and too many Mexicans are dying from violence related to the criminal gangs that traffic drugs. That is the unfortunate summary of a shared problem: Mexican organized crime groups help feed U.S. demand for illegal drugs, and in turn, many billions of U.S. dollars feed the violence and corruption which the criminal groups spawn in Mexico.

Fighting Organized Crime Endangered by NAFTA Hardball

The United States and Mexico need to redouble their cooperation against organized crime in order to save lives in both countries, but hardline U.S. proposals now expected in the ongoing NAFTA renegotiation could put this vital security cooperation at risk. 

“U.S.-Mexico Cooperation against Organized Crime”: Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne’s presentation to Asociación de Bancos de México – 19th International Seminar on Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Finance on October 5, 2017 in Mexico City

Mexico and the United States face a very serious common threat from the organized crime groups which operate in both countries trafficking in drugs, arms, illicit funds, and people.  The two governments should redouble efforts to counter these threats to the well-being of citizens in both countries through addiction, violence and corruption.

What's Behind Rising Violence in Colima?: A Brief Look at 2016's Most Violent Mexican State

May 2017 was Mexico’s deadliest month on record.[1] 2,200 people were reportedly murdered nationwide that month, bringing the country’s death toll to nearly 10,000 since the beginning of the year. If the violence continues at this pace, 2017 will become Mexico’s most murderous year since the federal government began releasing homicide data in 1997, surpassing its previous annual homicide record of 23,000 murders in 2011.

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