Organized Crime

Fighting Organized Crime Endangered by NAFTA Hardball

The United States and Mexico need to redouble their cooperation against organized crime in order to save lives in both countries, but hardline U.S. proposals now expected in the ongoing NAFTA renegotiation could put this vital security cooperation at risk. 

“U.S.-Mexico Cooperation against Organized Crime”: Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne’s presentation to Asociación de Bancos de México – 19th International Seminar on Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Finance on October 5, 2017 in Mexico City

Mexico and the United States face a very serious common threat from the organized crime groups which operate in both countries trafficking in drugs, arms, illicit funds, and people.  The two governments should redouble efforts to counter these threats to the well-being of citizens in both countries through addiction, violence and corruption.

What's Behind Rising Violence in Colima?: A Brief Look at 2016's Most Violent Mexican State

May 2017 was Mexico’s deadliest month on record.[1] 2,200 people were reportedly murdered nationwide that month, bringing the country’s death toll to nearly 10,000 since the beginning of the year. If the violence continues at this pace, 2017 will become Mexico’s most murderous year since the federal government began releasing homicide data in 1997, surpassing its previous annual homicide record of 23,000 murders in 2011.

Dying for a Story: How Impunity and Violence against Mexican Journalists are Weakening the Country

Mexico has faced significant threats and violence from organized crime over the last decade. The human toll and tragedy of this violence is directly impacting journalists as well, leading to self-censorship, under-reporting of organized crime, and the corruption and state complicity that comes with it. Journalists have been killed, injured, and threatened as they seek to investigate and report on what is happening, and dozens of media outlets have been forced to close in the last few years.

One-Month Anniversary of the Murder of Mexican Journalist Javier Valdez Cárdenas

One month ago today, world-renowned Mexican journalist Javier Valdez Cárdenas was ambushed by unidentified assailants while leaving his office in his hometown of Culiacán, Sinaloa. According to press reports, he was pulled from his car, shot a dozen times in the middle of the day on a crowded street, and left lifeless in the middle of the road. His signature Panama hat lay bloodied beside him.

America and Mexico to Tackle Increasing Drug Violence

Secretary of State Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary Kelly meet their Mexican counterparts on May 18 to discuss the fight against organized crime and drug smuggling. This is a positive sign in a relationship that has been shaken by U.S. criticisms this year. Both countries need good—and better—cooperation against drugs and cartels. The United States is suffering an epidemic of opioid overdoses fueled by the abuse of prescription drugs and heroin and synthetic opioids smuggled from Mexico. Mexico is suffering a surge in homicides fueled in part by the criminal gangs that feed U.S.

Rethinking U.S.-Mexico Security Strategy

 “And so we have an initiative underway where the senior members of the Mexican Government will be coming up here on May the 18th to participate in an interagency process with us to see if we can get at transnational organized crime and begin to break these organized crime units up.“  Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson speech to Department of State employees, May 3, 2017. 

La Impunidad Sigue: Violence against Journalists in Mexico

In yet another disturbing attack against freedom of expression in Mexico, one of the country’s most celebrated reporters, Javier Valdez Cárdenas, was shot and killed this week in his hometown of Culiacán, Sinaloa. The sixth journalist to be murdered in Mexico this year, Valdez was pulled from his car and shot multiple times by unidentified assailants around noon on May 15th, leaving the country to grieve the loss, again, of courageous journalist and rights defenders.

Target Interventions to Reduce Homicides in Mexico

Pages