Organized Crime

The Escape of El Chapo Guzmán and the Struggle Against Organized Crime

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On Saturday, July 11, around 9 p.m., drug kingpin Joaquín Guzmán Loera, better known as “El Chapo” Guzmán, escaped, for the second time, from a maximum security prison in Mexico.

Escape of drug lord 'El Chapo' leaves U.S.-Mexican relations on shaky ground

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Beyond El Chapo: Is The U.S.-Mexico Relationship Strained?

Since Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán Loera escaped a maximum security prison in Mexico, the U.S. has offered help in all forms to recapture the cartel leader. But Mexico has refused the offer. Is this another strain on the U.S.-Mexico relationship?

The Mexico Institute's Director Duncan Wood joins Huffington Post Live to discuss the effects of El Chapo's escape on the US-Mexico relationship. Other guests included Keegan Hamilton, VICE News, Malcolm Beith, Freelance Jouranlist, and Gerardo Rodríguez Sánchez Lara, Universidad de las Américas Puebla.

El Chapo Escapes: Major Setback for Mexico’s War on Organized Crime

The drug lord known as “El Chapo” has escaped from a maximum security prison for a second time. What are the implications for Mexico’s war on organized crime? Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood provides an overview.

Mexican Drug Kingpin, El Chapo, Escapes Prison Through Tunnel

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"It's shocking, embarrassing, a huge blow, almost everything under the sun," said Eric L. Olson, Associate Director of the Latin American Program at the Wilson Center who follows crime trends in Latin America. "It is almost Mexico's worst nightmare, and I suspect many in U.S. law enforcement are apoplectic right now."

"Mexico is going to be under increasing pressure from the U.S. in terms of extraditing these top people," he said.

Infographic: Citizen Security in Michoacán

 

Advancing Justice Sector Reform in Mexico

Mexico's deadline to fully implement new, adversarial criminal trial procedures is less than one year away. The government of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has pushed strongly to comply with the constitutionally mandated shift to the new criminal justice system by June 18, 2015, particularly in light of the country's ongoing security challenges. Together with the University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico program, the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a panel discussion to examine current efforts to implement the new reforms.

Citizen Security from the Ground-Up: Improving Practice at the Local Level

Improving citizen security remains a critical challenge throughout Latin America. Responses vary greatly between and also within countries—often down to the neighborhood level. With crime often concentrated in urban areas and neighborhood hotspots, local governments have emerged as sources of policy innovation in the fight against crime and violence.  What are these approaches and are there elements that are replicable in other cities, regions, or nations as a whole?

A Way to Restore Mexico’s Trust Deficit

The traditional stance of the PRI political party is to wait out protest: engage where essential and allow time to mollify.  Why then have the massacres of Tlatlaya and Ayotzinapa persisted in the Mexican mind? We approach 1 year since Tlatlaya when the Mexican army shot at close range 22 alleged gang members, claiming self-defense, and 8 months since 43 students at a famed teacher training College were murdered and thereafter disappeared.  The national uproar was intense with protest marches extending throughout the Mexican states and up into the United States.

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