Organized Crime

Advancing Justice Sector Reform in Mexico

Mexico's deadline to fully implement new, adversarial criminal trial procedures is less than one year away. The government of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has pushed strongly to comply with the constitutionally mandated shift to the new criminal justice system by June 18, 2015, particularly in light of the country's ongoing security challenges. Together with the University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico program, the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a panel discussion to examine current efforts to implement the new reforms.

Citizen Security from the Ground-Up: Improving Practice at the Local Level

Improving citizen security remains a critical challenge throughout Latin America. Responses vary greatly between and also within countries—often down to the neighborhood level. With crime often concentrated in urban areas and neighborhood hotspots, local governments have emerged as sources of policy innovation in the fight against crime and violence.  What are these approaches and are there elements that are replicable in other cities, regions, or nations as a whole?

A Way to Restore Mexico’s Trust Deficit

The traditional stance of the PRI political party is to wait out protest: engage where essential and allow time to mollify.  Why then have the massacres of Tlatlaya and Ayotzinapa persisted in the Mexican mind? We approach 1 year since Tlatlaya when the Mexican army shot at close range 22 alleged gang members, claiming self-defense, and 8 months since 43 students at a famed teacher training College were murdered and thereafter disappeared.  The national uproar was intense with protest marches extending throughout the Mexican states and up into the United States.

Transparency and the Rule of Law Series

Perhaps the greatest challenge Mexico is facing is building a genuine Rule of Law. The situation is currently characterized by a low level of trust in the authorities, a judicial system in transition to oral trials, and asymmetric institutional development between different levels of governments. In this context, the country has important historical challenges, such as improving processes that lead to effective protection of human rights, fighting corruption, and strengthening a system of transparency and accountability.

Urban Violence: Building Safe and Inclusive Cities in Latin America

Join us for a panel discussion on policy options for building safe and inclusive cities in Latin America based on recent field research conducted in several major urban areas in the region.

Welcoming Remarks:

Cynthia J. Arnson, Director, Latin American Program, Woodrow Wilson Center

Introduction:

Eric Hershberg, Director, Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, American University

Panelists:

Políticas anticrimen deficientes

To view this video, click here

NEW APPROACHES TO DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT AND RESPONSES TO ORGANIZED CRIME

Available for download below:

NEW APPROACHES TO DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT AND RESPONSES TO ORGANIZED CRIME
Report on the Side Event to the 56th Regular Session of CICAD
Event Date: November 18, 2014

NUEVOS ENFOQUES PARA LA APLICACIÓN DE LAS LEYES DE DROGAS Y RESPUESTAS A LA DELINCUENCIA ORGANIZADA
Relatoría del Evento-Paralelo del 56 Periodo de Sesiones Ordinarias de la CICAD
Fecha de evento: 18 noviember 2014

Reflections on Mexico's Southern Border

In early March, 2015, a small group of researchers from the Washington-based Wilson Center and from Mexico’s Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México and Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas traveled to the southwestern section of the Mexico-Guatemala border to observe developments in migration, various types of illicit trafficking, trade, and border management. While there, we met with a wide range of government and non-governmental actors. We crossed the border and visited the official and irregular installations at Ciudad Hidalgo-Tecún Umán and Talisman-El Carmen.

'Securing the Border: Understanding and Addressing the Root Causes of Central American Migration to the United States': Eric Olson Testifies before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs

Eric L. Olson, Associate Director of the Latin American Program, joins a panel of experts in testifying before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs on examining and addressing the root causes behind Central American migration to the United States.

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