Organized Crime

U.S.-Mexico Relations, Security and Human Rights

Mexico has experienced an intense security crisis, organized crime wave and an explosion in violent crime. In the past, scholars, analysts, and media commentators have overlooked the central role of U.S. policy towards Mexico, instead framing the discussion in terms of a battle over territory and political control between drug trafficking organizations and the state.

La política de la provocación en México

En septiembre del año pasado 43 estudiantes de un colegio de maestros, presuntamente fueron desaparecidos en la ciudad de Iguala en el estado de Guerrero en México, a manos de un alcalde y una fuerza policial corrupta en connivencia con una organización local de narcotraficantes. Además de los estudiantes desaparecidos, otras seis personas murieron y 25 resultaron heridas en enfrentamientos con la policía y otros grupos armados. A la fecha el paradero de los estudiantes es desconocido.

Violence and Insecurity in Guerrero

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Citizen Security in Mexico: Getting Better or Getting Worse?

In this edition of CONTEXT, Alejandro Hope (Mexican Institute for Competitiveness), and David Shirk (University of San Diego), review efforts to improve citizen security in Mexico in 2014. They also look ahead to what we can expect in 2015. Is the situation getting better or worse? The answer to that question has a lot to do with where you’re looking. Our guests sort through the good and bad news with an eye toward the future.

"Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence" Briefing Paper Series

This briefing series is a continuation of the project Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Citizen Security in Michoacán

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Violence and Citizen Participation in Mexico: From the Polls to the Streets

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead

The end of 2014 marked the second full year of Enrique Peña Nieto’s six-year term as Mexico’s president. While last year saw a victory for his administration with the February arrest of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, President Peña Nieto was also faced with major challenges and substantial public frustration due to Mexico’s on-going rule of law and security problems. 

What Will Obama & EPN Discuss?

On January 6, 2015, Presidents Enrique Peña Nieto and Barack Obama met in Washington, DC to discuss the bilateral relationship. Mexico Institute staff discussed what main issues should be on the agenda.

First, Andrew Selee discusses four issues on the agenda between the Presidents that are critical for both countries. Second, Duncan Wood says it is crucial that the United States and Mexico seize the opportunity to reinvigorate their mutual public security agenda. Lastly, Christopher Wilson discusses the three main issues that should be on the bilateral agenda.

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