Organized Crime

Violence and Insecurity in Guerrero

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Citizen Security in Mexico: Getting Better or Getting Worse?

In this edition of CONTEXT, Alejandro Hope (Mexican Institute for Competitiveness), and David Shirk (University of San Diego), review efforts to improve citizen security in Mexico in 2014. They also look ahead to what we can expect in 2015. Is the situation getting better or worse? The answer to that question has a lot to do with where you’re looking. Our guests sort through the good and bad news with an eye toward the future.

"Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence" Briefing Paper Series

This briefing series is a continuation of the project Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Citizen Security in Michoacán

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Violence and Citizen Participation in Mexico: From the Polls to the Streets

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead

The end of 2014 marked the second full year of Enrique Peña Nieto’s six-year term as Mexico’s president. While last year saw a victory for his administration with the February arrest of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, President Peña Nieto was also faced with major challenges and substantial public frustration due to Mexico’s on-going rule of law and security problems. 

What Will Obama & EPN Discuss?

On January 6, 2015, Presidents Enrique Peña Nieto and Barack Obama met in Washington, DC to discuss the bilateral relationship. Mexico Institute staff discussed what main issues should be on the agenda.

First, Andrew Selee discusses four issues on the agenda between the Presidents that are critical for both countries. Second, Duncan Wood says it is crucial that the United States and Mexico seize the opportunity to reinvigorate their mutual public security agenda. Lastly, Christopher Wilson discusses the three main issues that should be on the bilateral agenda.

Addressing the Concerns of the Oil Industry: Security Challenges in Northeastern Mexico and Government Responses

The December 2013 Constitutional Reform and August 2014 secondary legislation to permit private investment in Mexico’s oil and gas sector represents significant opportunities for private oil and gas companies. While overall geopolitical risk landscape in Mexico is low, cartel-related violence and other criminal activities continue to draw concern from international oil companies and other foreign investors.

Time to Reinvigorate the U.S.-Mexico Security Relationship

What a difference a year makes. 12 months ago, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto was the darling of international observers, having negotiated a landmark energy reform through the nation's Congress, capping off an extraordinary year of constitutional (and other) reforms. Although economic growth had been sluggish, it was expected that it would take off with higher government spending, increased consumer confidence and renewed export growth to the United States.

Crime and Violence in Central America's Northern Triangle: How U.S. Policy Responses are Helping, Hurting, and Can be Improved (No. 34)

Photos, left to right: After school program in Honduras, courtesy of Honduran Youth Alliance/Alianza Joven Honduras; U.S. Border Patrol Agent training Guatemalan Police, by Miguel Negronvia defenseimagery.mil (public domain);Mara Salvatrucha graffiti, by Flickr user Walking on Tracks (Creative Commons)

The full report and summary materials are available for download below.

 

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