Polar

America's New Foreign Policy Frontier

Heather Conley argues that the United States should use its chairmanship of the Arctic Council to strengthen its internal and external relations on issues including: Arctic shipping, reducing carbon short-lived climate forcers, and increasing awareness and focus on the well-being of indigenous communities.

Arctic Policies of Nordic States: The Politics of Geographical Definitions

Willy Østreng argues that the Arctic Council should form a more cohesive, comprehensive unit by closing ranks and operating as the Arctic 8, acting in concert, and stand united in order to maintain control of regional developments.

Arctic Policies of Japan, South Korea, and Singapore

Aki Tonami argues that Asian states, particularly Japan, South Korea, and Singapore, are mainly interested in the economic aspects of the Arctic, but will utilize their willingness to promote scientific cooperation for sustainable development in the region. The Arctic Council and other Arctic states should encourage intra-Asian cooperation on the Arctic and should attempt to settle historical and territorial grievances.

China's Undeclared Arctic Foreign Policy

Anne-Marie Brady argues that partnering with China in the Arctic, where possible, and developing an in-depth knowledge of China's Arctic interests and objectives will strengthen the United States' ability to give meaning to the development of a "new type of great power relationship." Furthermore, China should be encouraged to make a formal statement on its Arctic policy and interests, embracing transparency.

Canada and Future Challenges in the Arctic

Rob Huebert recommends that Canada and the United States should continue communicating with one another on matters related to Arctic sovereignty to avoid political misunderstandings and ensure proper surveillance and enforcement capabilities continue. Also, that Canada must ensure it meets NORAD, and the United States’, expectations in the Arctic, while providing the resources it needs to expand its our Arctic domain awareness.

Robin Bronen: To Help Alaskans Adapt, Make it Easier to Relocate

About the Polar Initiative

The Arctic is a region of international dialogue and potential competition, of varied challenges and diverse opportunities. It is also a region that is rapidly gaining in geopolitical significance as it undergoes profound environmental, economic, and social change.

The Wilson Center’s Polar Initiative is the comprehensive, non-partisan Arctic and Antarctic policy forum in the United States, tracking, analyzing, and making sense of these complex and interconnected dynamics.

National Security and Climate Change: What Do We Need to Know?

The effects of climate change “are here now” and pose a “serious challenge” for the United States, said Alice Hill, White House senior advisor for preparedness and resilience, at the Wilson Center on July 29.

Video Series: Who Owns the Arctic?

Tensions over security, access, and environmental impacts in the Arctic are rising. While members of the Arctic Council (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United States) assert their established rights under new circumstances, an increasing number of non-Arctic states (including China, Korea, Japan, and Singapore) seek an active role in the region.

In this video series, "Who Owns the Arctic?" an international panel of experts describes why one of the world’s coldest environments is becoming a hot topic.

 

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