Polar

China's Undeclared Arctic Foreign Policy

Anne-Marie Brady argues that partnering with China in the Arctic, where possible, and developing an in-depth knowledge of China's Arctic interests and objectives will strengthen the United States' ability to give meaning to the development of a "new type of great power relationship." Furthermore, China should be encouraged to make a formal statement on its Arctic policy and interests, embracing transparency.

Canada and Future Challenges in the Arctic

Rob Huebert recommends that Canada and the United States should continue communicating with one another on matters related to Arctic sovereignty to avoid political misunderstandings and ensure proper surveillance and enforcement capabilities continue. Also, that Canada must ensure it meets NORAD, and the United States’, expectations in the Arctic, while providing the resources it needs to expand its our Arctic domain awareness.

Robin Bronen: To Help Alaskans Adapt, Make it Easier to Relocate

About the Polar Institute

The Arctic is a region of international dialogue and potential competition, of varied challenges and diverse opportunities. It is also a region that is rapidly gaining in geopolitical significance as it undergoes profound environmental, economic, and social change.

The Wilson Center’s Polar Institute is the comprehensive, non-partisan Arctic and Antarctic policy forum in the United States, tracking, analyzing, and making sense of these complex and interconnected dynamics.

National Security and Climate Change: What Do We Need to Know?

The effects of climate change “are here now” and pose a “serious challenge” for the United States, said Alice Hill, White House senior advisor for preparedness and resilience, at the Wilson Center on July 29.

Video Series: Who Owns the Arctic?

Tensions over security, access, and environmental impacts in the Arctic are rising. While members of the Arctic Council (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United States) assert their established rights under new circumstances, an increasing number of non-Arctic states (including China, Korea, Japan, and Singapore) seek an active role in the region.

In this video series, "Who Owns the Arctic?" an international panel of experts describes why one of the world’s coldest environments is becoming a hot topic.

 

Arctic 2014: Who Gets a Voice and Why It Matters

Tensions over security, access, and environmental impacts in the Arctic are rising. While members of the Arctic Council (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United States) assert their established rights under new circumstances, an increasing number of non-Arctic states (including China, Korea, Japan, and Singapore) seek an active role in the region. Who are the key players and what are their primary objectives? What institutional framework will guarantee fair use and security in the Arctic?

National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change

Climate change poses a serious threat to U.S. national security and is becoming a “catalyst for conflict” in vulnerable countries, according to a panel of retired military leaders speaking at the Wilson Center on May 15.

China and Antarctica

Evaluating China as an Antarctic State

Professor Anne-Marie Brady

Editor-in-chief The Polar Journal

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars/

Department of Political Science/Gateway Antarctica,

University of Canterbury, New Zealand

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