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Africa in Transition: The Role of Women in Peace and Security

A country can achieve sustainable peace and security only if women are included, said Monde Muyangwa, Director of the Wilson Center’s Africa Program at a recent Wilson Center event

Managing Nigeria’s Diversity Amidst Rising Ethno-religious Tensions: A Conversation with H.E. Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria

On October 15, 2019, the Wilson Center Africa Program hosted Managing Nigeria’s Diversity Amidst Rising Ethno-religious Tensions: A Conversation with H.E. Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. The Honorable Frank R. Wolf, former member of the House of Representatives (R-VA) gave introductory remarks and joined H.E. President Olusegun Obasanjo for this address. Dr. Monde Muyangwa, Africa Program Director, moderated the event.

The Struggle for Peace in the Midst of Repression: Unified Voices from Nicaragua’s Civil Society Leaders

Following the breakdown of political negotiations between the Nicaraguan government and key opposition figures in August, political repression by state security forces has continued unabated. Civil society leaders, rural leaders, and independent journalists, among others, have been targeted by the administration of President Daniel Ortega.

Unpacking Perceptions and Attitudes: Arabs on the Economy, Women's Leadership and Youth

On September 19th, the Wilson Center will be hosting a panel discussion of the Arab Barometer's 2019 Surveys of the Arab world focused on perceptions and attitudes towards the economy, women's leadership and youth. 

Losing Brains and Brawn: Outmigration from Ukraine

BY DENYS KIRYUKHIN

Until a few years ago, the steady increase in outmigration from Ukraine and the subsequent loss of labor and intellectual capital were not at the forefront of the country’s concerns. Today the situation has changed: politicians and state authorities have injected a note of urgency in discussions of migration. It is telling that nearly all the presidential candidates in the recent elections raised the issues of labor migration and emigration almost as frequently as they did issues of corruption and the armed conflict in the Donbas.

Who Is Mr. Ivanov: Why Russia’s Middle Class Today Is Different

BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV

In the five years since 2014, the share of those in Russia who consider themselves middle class has shrunk from 60 percent to 47 percent. This is according to a study commissioned by the investment arm of Sberbank, Russia’s largest bank, on the “Ivanov index,” a measure of consumer confidence. “Ivanov,” a common Russian last name, is used to represent a typical middle-class person in Russia.

Citizenship without Borders: Russian Passports for Ukrainian Citizens

BY ALICE E. M. UNDERWOOD

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