Population

Learning to Become Turkmen: Literacy, Language, and Power, 1914-2014

Learning to Become Turkmen examines the ways in which the iconography of everyday life--in dramatically different alphabets, multiple languages, and shifting education policies--reflects the evolution of Turkmen society in Central Asia over the past century. As Victoria Clement shows, the formal structures of the Russian imperial state did not affect Turkmen cultural formations nearly as much as Rusian language and Cyrillic script. Their departure was also as transformative to Turkmen politics and society as their arrival.

New Polling Data from Mexico: Does Positive Opinion of the U.S. Depend on Progress in NAFTA Talks?

The Venezuelan Refugee Crisis - The Brazilian Perspective

Special Weekly Asado - Labor Discord

Poll: Mexicans' View of United States Hits Record Low

In a stunning reversal, a 65 percent majority of Mexicans hold an unfavorable view of the United States, compared to 66 percent holding a favorable view in 2015, according to new public opinion research from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Buendia & Laredo, and the Wilson Center's Mexico Institute. This survey, taken near the end of Donald Trump's first year in office, marks the first time in two decades that a majority of Mexicans hold an unfavorable view of the United States.

A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion and U.S.-Mexico Relations

The Wilson Center and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs are pleased to invite you to an event on public opinion on U.S.-Mexico relations. Over the last two to three decades, public opinion in the bilateral relationship has risen and fallen, and U.S.-Mexico relations have hit a rough patch since the election of Donald Trump. Today, Mexican public opinion of the United States has fallen to a historic low; however, U.S. opinion of Mexico is quite strong and on the rise.

A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion in U.S.-Mexico Relations

Since the 1980s, the cooperation between the U.S. and Mexican governments has improved tremendously. However, despite the deepening governmental, economic, and societal ties that have occurred over the last two to three decades, the way in which the U.S. and Mexican publics view one another has experienced several ups and downs. Public opinion in the bilateral relationship has risen and fallen even as official relations between the United States and Mexico steadily improved.

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