Population | Wilson Center

Population

'Challenges at the Border: Examining and Addressing the Root Causes Behind the Rise in Apprehensions at the Southern Border': Eric Olson Testifies before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs

Eric L. Olson, Associate Director of the Latin American Program, joined a panel of experts in testifying before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs on examining and addressing the root causes behind the rise in apprehensions at the southern border.

To watch the webcast go here. Olson's testimony is available for download below.

Burgeoning Growth

The military offensive under way in North Waziristan has triggered a humanitarian crisis. Hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced. Many are staying in refugee camps in KP. However, if history is any guide, scores will eventually end up in Pakistani cities.

World Population Day 2014: Youth Engagement and the Sustainable Development Agenda

“The greatest challenge we have today is that we have a world that is pushing back on rights,” said Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, executive director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), at the Wilson Center.

7 Billion People, One Planet

There was a time when predictions of “overpopulation” and books like The Population Bomb dominated discussions of environmental concerns. But in an era of climate change, how we think and talk about population and where it sits on the list of environmental concerns is changing.

On the eve of World Population Day 2014, Roger-Mark De Souza, director of population, environmental security, and resilience for the Wilson Center discusses the latest thinking on population issues.

Latin American Program in the News: "Wave of Central American migrants strains Border Patrol, reducing number of drug busts"

[...]

As the humanitarian crisis intensifies, U.S. officials are raising the pressure on their Mexican and Central American counterparts to halt the flow of migrants, many of whom are driven by violence, poverty and the perception that they will be allowed to stay if they reach U.S. soil. Secretary of State John F. Kerry raised the issue during a recent visit to Mexico. And Vice President Biden was headed to Guatemala on Friday to discuss a tightening of that country's border with Mexico.

Dawn of the Smart City? Perspectives From New York, Ahmedabad, São Paulo, and Beijing

Rapid growth and environmental change are creating new challenges for urban areas around the world. From climate change adaptation and crime prevention to the integration of new residents, much is being asked of municipal governments. At the same time, new technologies – from data collection and real time monitoring to sophisticated “control centers” – are being developed that could help inform urban decision making and improve city management. Four essays present perspectives on the ideas behind smart cities from New York, Ahmedabad, São Paulo, and Beijing.

Why Do People Move? Research on Environmental Migration Coming of Age

When she finished her dissertation on migration as a response to climate change in 2003, it was one of only a handful of scholarly papers published on the topic that year, said Susana Adamo, an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network. But in the decade since, interest in climate migration has exploded – in 2012, more than 10 times as many papers were published.

The Roma and Human Rights: Challenges and Goals in 2014 – Lessons from the Past, Eyes to the Future

This is one in a series of events sponsored in collaboration with the Ratiu Family Foundation.

The Rob Ford Phenomenon: What’s going on in Toronto?

Canadians and Americans look at the Rob Ford saga with a mix of amusement, curiosity, and horror. How did Ford become mayor of a sophisticated and progressive city like Toronto in the first place? And why does he continue to keep the support of a significant portion of the voting public?

Pages