Population | Wilson Center

Population

Infographic: A History of Immigration Policy and Migration Flows

 

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Upholding Housing Discrimination Law

History and Context

The Fair Housing Act, part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status and disability in the sale, rental and financing of housing-related transactions. Intentional discrimination resulting in disparate treatment is forbidden.

Roger-Mark De Souza Discusses Family Planning, Empowerment, and the Environment

Colorado has seen a historic drop in the pregnancy rate among teens and poor women, thanks to a pioneering family planning program providing long-acting birth control for free.

Powerless in Pakistan

Last week, Pakistan was hit by a heat wave of highly tragic proportions.

The country has suffered through deadly hot spells in the past, but the lethality of this latest one was astounding. According to Pakistani officials, high temperatures killed more than 1,200 people — most of them in Karachi — over a one-week period. The true figure could be much higher, given the likelihood of unreported deaths.

Changing the World: How USAID’s 50 Years of Family Planning has Transformed People, Economies, and the Planet

Since President Lyndon B. Johnson created the USAID population program in 1965, it has evolved in tandem with the global discourse on population and demography. “The agency’s family planning program is as relevant today as it ever was, and is necessary,” said Jennifer Adams, deputy assistant administrator of the U.S. Agency of International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.

World Population Day 2015: Demographic Resilience

As events and discussions centered around World Population Day 2015 begin and continue, we spoke with the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza about the concept of “demographic resilience.” Is a younger population more prone to conflict and instability? And what other contextual factors weigh in to the equation? He explains the meaning of “demographic resilience, and offers thoughts on its usefulness as a lens through which to view and assess the overall health of a community. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

The Sahel Beyond the Headlines: Population, Environment, and Security Dynamics

Between the Sahara to the north and savanna to the south lies the semi-arid Sahel, a region stretching from Senegal to Sudan that has experienced desperate poverty, climate change, malnutrition, and violence. While every context is different, the Sahelian countries share some common challenges, including a pattern of recurring crises and fluid borders. Boko Haram’s reign of terror in northern Nigeria and Mali’s coup have both had cross-border components.

Mist of the Earth: Art and Sustainability

 “Mist of the Earth,” an exhibition of photographs and photo-collages by renewed Brazilian artist Denise Milan, joins memory and history and invites viewers on a journey of imagination and reflection about the environmental challenges of development. On May 20, a panel of experts will join the artist to discuss the roles of art in sustainability as the Brazil Institute welcomes “Mist of the Earth” to Washington. A viewing of the artwork with Milan and exhibit Curator Simon Watson will follow.

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