Population | Wilson Center

Population

Telling Tales of Complex Connections

Policy wonks and academics produce voluminous tomes on sustainability issues, but how to get these before a larger audience? One wonkish think tank hard at work on this problem, the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center, is producing a series of short films to tell the stories that move these concerns toward a wider audience. The idea is to take complex, interacting factors and show how they affect real people.

Event Summary: Climate Change Adaptation, Urban Planning, and the Private Sector in Colombia

On February 25, 2015, the Wilson Center's Latin American Program and USAID/Colombia convened a full day seminar with leaders from Colombian govenment ministries and private sector firms to discuss climate change adaptation, urban planning, and the role of the role of the private sector. National and international experts and policymakers presented case studies, delivered expert presentations, and engaged with representitives of naitonal, regional, and municipal government from across Colombia, as well as private sector representatives.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. Yet as the country grapples with a rapidly graying population on the one hand and a steady decline in birthrate, opening its doors to more foreigners may be a question of when rather than if.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
 
About the films:

We Want What's Ours: Learning from South Africa's Land Restitution Process

We Want What's Ours: Learning from South Africa's Land Restitution Process

On June 30, 2014, President Zuma announced the re-opening of the land claims process. In the next round, South Africa must build on the successes and learn from the mistakes of the first round of restitution.

Food Security & Population Dynamics in the Sahel

Africa’s Sahel region is one of the most harsh environments on the planet with one of the highest birth rates as well. Food security, particularly when combined with population dynamics and the impact of climate change, is a monumental challenge. The Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza just returned from Niger, where he met with experts from a variety of countries for the purpose of identifying what works and what doesn’t. We discuss what he learned in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

Roger-Mark De Souza on Population Growth and Sustainable Development

Population and the environment are clearly linked, but it’s not a simple equation of fewer people = fewer problems. Roger-Mark DeSouza, director of population, environmental security, and resilience for the Wilson Center, draws the line between population and every other important issue currently facing humans — climate change, urban development, global politics, poverty, the gender gap, and more — in this in-depth interview.

Read the full interview over at Beacon.

The Great Exodus: Ukraine's Refugees Flee to Russia

The fact that most of the Ukrainians who fled their country last year went to Russia may come as a surprise to some. The reasons for this are interesting and have been skillfully examined in recent articles. Where are the Ukrainian refugees going in Russia and what awaits them when they arrive? How are they being treated and what do they think of their new surroundings? We took a closer look at these questions in Perm, a city and region in the Ural Mountains, which in 2014 became one of the major hubs in Russia for Ukrainian refugees.

“Where is Perm?”

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