Population

How Modi’s Evolution From Pariah to Pop Star Could Boost U.S.-India Ties

A few months ago, Narendra Modi was persona non grata in the United States–banned because of allegations that he failed to stop deadly anti-Muslim riots in the Indian state of Gujarat, where he was chief minister, in 2002.

Fast-forward to the past few days. Mr. Modi, now prime minister of India, has regaled large and adoring crowds in New York and hobnobbed with high-level officials, including President Barack Obama, in Washington.

Addicted to Putin

MOSCOW – Watching Russia’s worrying trajectory under President Vladimir Putin, many foreign observers ask how a leader who is so apparently driving his country toward the abyss can remain so popular. The answer is simple: Putin’s supporters – that is, a hefty majority of Russians – do not see the danger ahead.

Three Great Ideas That Weren't on the UNGA Agenda

The 69th UN General Assembly was “an absolutely extraordinary opportunity” to rethink global development, said Genevieve Maricle, a senior policy advisor to the U.S. Ambassador to the UN Social and Economic Council (ECOSOC) who participated in the summit.

The New Climate Economy

The New Climate Economy is the flagship project of the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, and was established by seven countries, Colombia, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Norway, South Korea, Sweden and the United Kingdom, as an independent initiative to examine how countries can achieve economic growth while dealing with the risks posed by climate change.  

Tackling Japan’s Demographic Time Bomb

The writing is clearly on the wall: Japan needs more tax-paying, young citizens to offset its ever-increasing number of pensioners if these retirees wish to maintain their current standards of living. The question, however, is whether there are public policies that can provide a solution to this impending crisis, and what may happen if the number of Japanese retirees continues to surge past the number of workers.

Eastern Europe’s Most Difficult Transition: Public Health and Demographic Policy, Two Decades after the Cold War

Dr. Murray Feshbach was one of the first scholars to point out the devastating political and socio-economic effects of state communism’s failure to seriously address decaying public health and environmental conditions. His pioneering work remains relevant. More than two decades after the close of the Cold War, many health and demographic indicators in the former Warsaw-Pact states (including Russia) remain surprisingly inferior to those of the neighboring states of Western and Southern Europe.  

Governing the Horn of Africa’s Lowlands: Land Investments and Villagization in Gambella, Ethiopia

"Since 2001, the Ethiopian government has been committed to building a “developmental state,” one with a strong state-led macro-economic plan, much like that of East Asian countries. After 2005, the developmental agenda took center stage in public discourse. This increasingly dominant discourse frames poverty as an existential threat to Ethiopia’s survival, necessitating its eradication by hastening development at all costs.

Russia: The World's Second-Largest Immigration Haven

“Immigrants aren't rushing to Moscow in search of opportunity”—President Obama recently stated in an interview with The Economist, while making a larger point about Russia’s receding role in the world. While much of his commentary on the overall state of affairs in Russia was accurate, his comments on a lack of immigrants in Moscow revealed a blind spot in his view of global-migration movements—immigrants have been rushing to Moscow for the last twenty years, and not only to Moscow, but to cities all over Russia.

Underage: Addressing Reproductive Health and HIV in Married Adolescents

In July, thousands of people attended the 20th International AIDS Conference and the 2014 Girls Summit to work towards an AIDS-free generation and ending child and forced marriage. But such attention is rare; by and large, these girls are invisible to development efforts.

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