Post-Cold War

Forgotten Parties to the INF

On February 2, 2019, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the United States’ decision to withdraw from the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, citing the Russian Federation’s material breach of the Treaty as justification for the decision.

According to Article XV of the Treaty, the United States will suspend its obligations under the Treaty 60 days after providing notice, unless in this time, Russia agrees to come in compliance.

'At the very heart of Europe': New Evidence on John Major's Foreign Policy

The British National Archives in Kew is a special place.

In 2013, it began its move towards releasing records when they reach 20 years old, instead of 30 years. Since then, two further years’ worth of government records are being transferred to the archives year until 2022, when the archives will receive the records from 2001 and 2002.

Security for Disarmament: Negotiating Ukraine’s Budapest Memorandum

The ongoing Russian-Ukrainian conflict, with its recent escalation in the Sea of Azov, continues to draw attention to the substance of security commitments pledged by the nuclear weapons states to Ukraine in exchange for dismantling the nuclear arsenal it inherited from the Soviet Union.

Development and Dystopia: Studies in Post-Soviet Ukraine and Eastern Europe

This book dissects—from both philosophical and empirical viewpoints—the peculiar developmental challenges, geopolitical contexts, and dystopic stalemates that post-Soviet societies face during their transition to new political and cultural orders. The principal geographical focus of the essays is Ukraine, but most of the assembled texts are also relevant and/or refer to other post-Soviet countries.

Ukraine and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

Ukrainian Foreign Ministry documents reveal the importance of the NPT in 1994 decision to denuclearize.

This year, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) is celebrating its 50th anniversary since it opened for signature on July 1, 1968.

Paying for Retirement: Challenges for Private Pension Development in Eastern Europe

How to meet the economic as well as social needs of the elderly is a challenge for any government. It has been particularly taxing for countries transitioning from a command economy in to a free market economy, as citizens have had to adjust expectations for what they should expect from the private as well as public sectors to fund their retirement. Adapting expectations and educating current and future pensioners has been a tremendous hurdle for governments as they look to making fundamental changes in paying for pensions.

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