Race and Ethnicity | Wilson Center

Race and Ethnicity

Comparative Peace Processes in Latin America

Presenting a carefully structured comparative analysis of six Latin American countries—Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Colombia, and Peru—that experienced guerilla warfare that outlasted the end of the Cold War, this volume explores the unique constellation of national and international events that allowed some wars to end in negotiated settlement, one to end in virtual defeat of the insurgents, and others to rage on. The contributors also examine comparatively such recurrent dilemmas as securing justice for human rights abuses, reforming the military and police forces, and recon

The American Planning Tradition: Culture and Policy

The past half-century’s radical transformation of American cities and regions has paradoxically stimulated our interest in older forms of cities and renewed our respect for the planning tradition that created them. Today, with everything urban and public perpetually in crisis, we turn attentively toward the figures who shaped our cities and left a magnificent legacy of public spaces, public transit, public parks, public libraries, public schools, public health, and public safety.

Race, Self-Employment, and Upward Mobility: An Illusive American Dream

Race, Self-Employment, and Upward Mobility refutes conventional notions about entrepreneurship with a wealth of unimpeachable data. Timothy Bates finds that self-employment and upward mobility are open to those who are highly educated and skilled, often possessing significant personal financial resources. This is true among Asian Americans, African Americans, and everybody else, too.

India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years

One fifth of the world’s people live in India and Pakistan. Looking back on their first fifty years of independence, leading specialists on South Asia assess their progress and problems, their foreign and defense policies and their relations with the United States. The three coeditors, who compare the achievements of India and Pakistan in a perceptive introductory overview, combine journalistic, diplomatic and academic experience

In addition to these explorations and comparisons of internal issues, the final chapter reviews U.S. relations with India and Pakistan.

The Crisis in Kashmir: Portents of War, Hopes of Peace

This book traces the origins of the insurgency in Indian-controlled Jammu and Kashmir. The first theoretically-grounded account, and the most complete, it is based on extensive interviews. Ganguly’s central argument is that the insurgency can be explained by political mobilization and institutional decay. In an attempt to woo the Muslims, the government dramatically expanded literacy, mass media, and higher education. Meanwhile, fearing potential secessionist proclivities, it stifled the development of political institutions.

Beyond the Monolith: The Emergence of Regionalism in Post-Soviet Russia

In the wake of the USSR’s breakup, the eighty-nine constituent subjects of the Russian Federation emerged as political players, grasping power for local policies from a weakened central authority and electing the legislators who have altered the complexion of the central government. Beyond the Monolith examines the impact of Russia’s emerging regionalism on the political, economic, and social transformation of the largest of the successor states of the Soviet Union.

Race: The History of an Idea in the West

In Race: The History of an Idea in the West, Ivan Hannaford guides readers through a dangerous engagement with an idea that so permeates Western thinking that we expect to find it, active or dormant, as an organizing principle in all societies. But as Hannaford shows, race is not a universal idea--not even in the West. It is an idea with a definite pedigree, and Hannaford traces that confused pedigree from Hesiod to the Holocaust and beyond.

Pages