Religion

Special Issue of Asian Affairs Addresses Religious Freedom in South Asia

The Asia Program is pleased to announce the publication of a special issue of the journal Asian Affairs edited by Wilson Center fellow Dr. Neeti Nair and Asia Program deputy director Michael Kugelman.

The House of Islam: A Global History

A fascinating and revelatory exploration of the intricacies of Islam and the inner psyche of the Muslim world from the bestselling author of The Islamist 'Not just timely but important too. Ed Husain does not just set out the fundamentals of Islam as a religion but explains how and why understanding it properly matter. This should be compulsory reading' Peter Frankopan, author of The Silk Roads `Islam began as a stranger,' said the Prophet Mohammed, `and one day, it will again return to being a stranger.' The gulf between Islam and the West is widening.

Book Launch: The House of Islam: A Global History

Please join us for a look inside The House of Islam, a revelatory exploration of the intricacies of Islam and the inner psyche of the Muslim world, from the bestselling author of The Islamist, Ed Husain:

Secularism and India’s Electoral Democracy

On the eve of India’s first general elections in 1951, the first to be held in free India, and on the basis of a universal adult franchise, Dr. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee, former minister in Jawaharlal Nehru’s government and former president of the right-wing Hindu Mahasabha, extolled the virtues of a multiparty democracy, and urged the formation of a new “national political party with faith in India’s culture and traditions.” Mukherjee would go on to found the Bharatiya Jana Sangh, predecessor of today’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).

Mobilizing the Russian Nation: Patriotism and Citizenship in the First World War

The First World War had a devastating impact on the Russian state, yet relatively little is known about the ways in which ordinary Russians experienced and viewed this conflict. Melissa Kirschke Stockdale presents the first comprehensive study of the Great War's influence on Russian notions of national identity and citizenship.

Purifying the Land of the Pure: A History of Pakistan’s Religious Minorities

When Pakistan emerged as an independent state in 1947, it sought to provide a new homeland and safe harbor for South Asia's Muslims, the largest religious minority in the subcontinent at the time. Yet this project was not exclusive. Taking its name from Pakstan, an acronym composed of the key letters of its constituent regions-Punjab, Afghania, Kashmir, Sindh, and Baluchistan-Pakistan at first welcomed all of its new citizens, Muslim and non-Muslim alike. Non-Muslims comprised 23 percent of the total population, and non-Sunnis comprised a quarter of the Muslim population.

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