Religion | Wilson Center

Religion

Book Launch -Sharia and the State in Pakistan: Blasphemy Politics

This event marks the launch of a new book by former Wilson Center fellow Farhat Haq. Sharia and the State analyzes the formulation, interpretation, and implementation of sharia in Pakistan and its relationship with the Pakistani state.

Immigrants, Evangelicals, and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change

As immigration from Asia and Latin America reshapes the demographic composition of the U.S., some analysts have anticipated the decline of conservative white evangelicals’ influence in politics. Yet, Donald Trump captured a larger share of the white evangelical vote in the 2016 election than any candidate in the previous four presidential elections. Why has the political clout of white evangelicals persisted at a time of increased racial and ethnic diversity?

Remembering the Rohingya

The plight of the Rohingya community is one of the saddest, and most underreported, stories of modern times.

This Muslim community has long suffered through persecution, marginalization, and mass migration. Its numbers are highest in Burma—about a million, according to most estimates—but they also live on the fringes of society in India and in many countries across the Muslim world.

What’s Next for the Rohingya?

Join the livestream of this event on Twitter at 3 p.m. Eastern by following @TheWilsonCenter.
 

Event Recap: Islamic Law, the Nation State, and the Case of Pakistan

In recent decades, ambivalence toward modernity, along with the promise of justice and morality, have led to efforts in some Muslim-majority countries to partially “Islamize” the state. Pakistan presents an important case study. Pakistan’s Islamization program in the 1970s and 1980s promised increased justice and other public goods by virtue of laws purportedly rooted in revelation. This program has resulted in some controversial outcomes, such as Pakistan’s blasphemy law.

AfPak File Podcast- The Aasia Bibi Case: Significance and Implications

On October 31, Pakistan’s Supreme Court acquitted Aasia Bibi, a Christian woman who had been on death row for nearly a decade on blasphemy charges. It was a milestone decision in a country where the law is often unkind to religious minorities. Islamist hardliners took to the streets to protest the decision, and eventually, they signed an agreement with the government that ensured that her case would be reviewed.

Pages