Rule of Law

¿Cómo introducir medidas anticorrupción en el TLCAN?

La corrupción incrementa el costo de hacer negocios, permite el uso ineficiente de recursos públicos, perpetúa la pobreza y la desigualdad, y deslegitima al Estado mexicano. Reducirla sería una forma bastante eficaz para incrementar nuestra competitividad, pues se estima, los sobornos agregan costos de hasta 10% en las transacciones en los negocios (WEF, 2014).

Justice Luis Roberto Barroso on Brazil’s Institutional Challenge: Showing That Corruption Will Not Prevail

The severity of economic, political, and moral crisis that has paralyzed Brazil for the past three years prompted Luis Roberto Barroso, one of the eleven justices of the Brazilian Supreme Court, to speak bluntly in recent public statements: “We desperately need political reform to counter the sense of devastation brought by corruption,” Barroso said.

Citizenship and Justice: The Brazilian Supreme Court in a Time of Relentless Transformation by Chief Justice Cármen Lúcia

Inspired by the hopeful evolution of the nation’s crisis, the Brazil Institute launched in July 2016 a lecture series to explore the various institutional aspects of this historic, ongoing transformation in Latin America’s largest country. The initiative, reflective of a broader Wilson Center focus on the global fight against corruption, brings to Washington audiences the judges, prosecutors, defense lawyers, legal experts, and practitioners engaged in the evolution of justice and rule of law in Brazil.

Lula’s Sentencing Should Be a Sober Moment for All Brazilians

Lucia Guimarães is a veteran Brazilian journalist and a columnist for O Estado de S. Paulo newspaper.

The Brazilian Judicial System

Brazil's judiciary is a multifaceted system that operates on the state and federal levels, much like the U.S. judicial system. Primarily based on the civil law tradition, it divides cases into several different jurisdictions, including labor, electoral, military, constitutional and non-constitutional. It also includes three instances of appeal, with cases able to advance from first-level courts all the way to either the Supreme Federal Court or the Superior Court of Justice.

The Brazilian Judicial System

Brazil's judiciary is a multifaceted system that operates on the state and federal levels, much like the U.S. judicial system. Primarily based on the civil law tradition, it divides cases into several different jurisdictions, including labor, electoral, military, constitutional and non-constitutional. It also includes three instances of appeal, with cases able to advance from first-level courts all the way to either the Supreme Federal Court or the Superior Court of Justice.

Infographic | Freedom of Expression & Violence against Journalists in Mexico

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Corruption accusations against Temer add to political turmoil and uncertainty in Brazil

An unpopular president declares war on the attorney general, vows he will not be “destroyed”

 

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