Science and Technology

Hong Kong Conference Report: Part 1 (Chinese)

Through a generous grant from the U.S. Institute of Peace, ECSP organized a forum in Hong Kong to provide opportunities for 65 environmentalists and journalists from the three areas of Greater China to discuss improving the capacity of environmental NGOs and the quality of environmental reporting in the region. Part 1 (Chinese).

Climate Change Politics in North America: The State of Play

This report contains papers from a two-day conference on Climate Change Politics in North America, organized at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, May 18-19, 2006. The conference papers and participants endeavored to critically examine key aspects and issues of North American politics and policymaking related to climate change. Edited By Henrik Selin and Stacy D. VanDeveer.

Book Discussion: Winning the Oil End Game: Innovations for Profits, Jobs and Security

The United States can and should terminate its reliance on oil within the next few decades while increasing its global economic competitiveness, argued Anthony Lovins, president and CEO of the Rocky Mountain Institute. Presenting the findings of his book, Winning the Oil End Game: Innovations for Profits, Jobs, and Security, Lovins maintained that business-for-profit and military innovations to increase fuel efficiency and to utilize energy alternatives could greatly benefit U.S. security and economic interests.

Dinner Honoring His Excellency, Festus Mogae, President of the Republic of Botswana

President Mogae spoke to invitees from different Washington NGOs, US government offices, Intergovernmental Organizations and participants in the Corporate Council for Africa's Africa-US Business Summit. After President Mogae's speech he entertained questions from dinner attendees regarding various subjects including investment, diversification, and HIV/AIDS in Botswana.

President Mogae's remarks are as follows:

Japan's Declining Population: Clearly a Problem, But What's the Solution?

The four experts who spoke at an April 24 Asia Program seminar on Japan's declining population agreed that the problem was multidimensional: Japanese men continue to face the pressures of long hours at work, and are increasingly reluctant to marry; women are choosing to marry later, have less children, or not marry at all; the government has rejected immigration as a solution to replenish a declining population; and official policy is instead looking to technology, mainly in the form of humanoid robots, to resolve the declining population problem.

Urban Transport Development in China - Trends and Challenges

Although China's overall personal vehicle sales and ownership rates are low when compared to the United States, the roads in China's largest cities are already clogged with cars and their emissions are the leading source of urban pollution. The wave of car purchases increases monthly—one recent survey showed that 13 percent of urbanites in Shanghai, Beijing, and Guangdong intend to buy a car within the next 12 months.

Environmental Health Crises in Southwest China

Millions of rural and urban citizens in China suffer from health problems and limits to economic development due to contamination or shortages of water and air pollution from coal. In southwest China, water challenges are particularly acute due to that region's karst geology, where much of the water flows underground through caves rather than on the surface. These health problems are yet another burden on tens of millions of subsistence farmers.

Sustainable Transportation Services for the Urban Poor

On February 20, 2007, the Comparative Urban Studies Project (CUSP) organized a seminar to discuss sustainable transportation services for the urban poor. Ellen Brennan Galvin, lecturer & senior research scholar at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University and CUSP advisory board member, pointed out that the links between poverty and transportation have long been ignored.

The Current State of Chinese Innovation

In January 2006, the People’s Republic of China(PRC) launched a fifteen-year “Medium- to Long-Term Plan for the Development of Science and Technology,” otherwise known as the MLP. The plan set out two ambitious goals for China. The first is for the PRC to become an "innovation-oriented society" by the year 2020, and world leader in science and technology (S&T) by 2050. Having already built the world’s largest hydroelectric dam and the fastest supercomputer and bullet train, it seems as though the Chinese are well on their way.

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