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Science and Technology

Urban Transport Development in China - Trends and Challenges

Although China's overall personal vehicle sales and ownership rates are low when compared to the United States, the roads in China's largest cities are already clogged with cars and their emissions are the leading source of urban pollution. The wave of car purchases increases monthly—one recent survey showed that 13 percent of urbanites in Shanghai, Beijing, and Guangdong intend to buy a car within the next 12 months.

Environmental Health Crises in Southwest China

Millions of rural and urban citizens in China suffer from health problems and limits to economic development due to contamination or shortages of water and air pollution from coal. In southwest China, water challenges are particularly acute due to that region's karst geology, where much of the water flows underground through caves rather than on the surface. These health problems are yet another burden on tens of millions of subsistence farmers.

Sustainable Transportation Services for the Urban Poor

On February 20, 2007, the Comparative Urban Studies Project (CUSP) organized a seminar to discuss sustainable transportation services for the urban poor. Ellen Brennan Galvin, lecturer & senior research scholar at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University and CUSP advisory board member, pointed out that the links between poverty and transportation have long been ignored.

The Current State of Chinese Innovation

In January 2006, the People’s Republic of China(PRC) launched a fifteen-year “Medium- to Long-Term Plan for the Development of Science and Technology,” otherwise known as the MLP. The plan set out two ambitious goals for China. The first is for the PRC to become an "innovation-oriented society" by the year 2020, and world leader in science and technology (S&T) by 2050. Having already built the world’s largest hydroelectric dam and the fastest supercomputer and bullet train, it seems as though the Chinese are well on their way.

Public Policy on the Technological Frontier

This article can be found in Chapter Four of the book, "The Growing Gap Between Emerging Technologies and Legal-Ethical Oversight: The Pacing Problem."  Click here for the link. 

 

Canadian Astronaut Reflects on Space Missions

Looking at Earth from space is like "seeing a blue marble in a black drop of darkness," said Julie Payette, a Canadian astronaut who is spending six months in residence as a Wilson Center public policy scholar. Payette is one of only four astronauts in Canada.

PEN 19 - Voluntary Initiatives, Regulation, and Nanotechnology Oversight

Enough voluntary initiatives for nanotechnology have been implemented so they can be looked at together, in a comparative sense, and historically, in terms of their relationship to programs that have preceded them. This report provides that analysis for the first time. In Voluntary Initiatives, Regulation, and Nanotechnology Oversight: Charting a Path, Dr.

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