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Security and Defense

The Lingering, and Complicating, Threat of ISIS in Afghanistan

The terror group Islamic State, or ISIS, recently asserted responsibility for a horrific attack on a wedding hall in Kabul. The tragedy in Afghanistan’s capital city took the lives of more than 60 people, and wounded nearly 200 hundred more.

What Does the Rise of China’s Security Partnerships Mean for Asia?

Over the past few weeks, new details have emerged around a potential Chinese military facility in Cambodia, which could possibly give Beijing its first installation of its kind in Southeast Asia.

Ice-Diminishing Arctic: Speaker Interview Series

On July 17 and 18, 2019, the US Arctic Research Commission, Wilson Center's Polar Institute, and US National Ice Center hosted the 8th Biennial Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Naval and Maritime Operations (IDA). Speakers discussed a wide array of issues facing the Arctic region, including: marine transportation; federal, state, local, and international operations; security; scientific research; infrastructure and investments; governance; policy implications in the region; and much more.

Nuclear Weapons and Their Pride of Place in North Korea

Visiting my colleague Van Jackson’s office in New Zealand last week, I spotted a classic North Korean souvenir on his shelf: commemorative stamps, packaged as a booklet and sold to the tourist who brought it back for him as a gift last year. These stamps are not of the iconic Juche Tower or the Arch of Triumph (which every North Korean will point out is taller than its counterpart in Paris).

AfPak File: Assessing Imran Khan’s Visit To America

Earlier this week, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan made his first visit to Washington since he became prime minister. He met with President Trump at the White House and held a series of other high-level meetings with U.S. officials and corporate leaders, among other activities.

The latest edition of The AfPak File reviews and assesses Khan’s visit. What are the main takeaways? Did Washington and Islamabad get what they wanted? And what’s next for the U.S.-Pakistan relationship?

Break all the Borders: Separatism and the Reshaping of the Middle East

Since 2011, civil wars and state failure have wracked the Arab world, underlying the misalignment between national identity and political borders. In Break all the Borders, Ariel I. Ahram examines the separatist movements that aimed to remake those borders and create new independent states.

Managing the Rise of China's Security Partnerships in Southeast Asia

Over the past few years, while China has continued its criticism of the U.S. alliance system in the Asia-Pacific, Beijing has in fact been developing a network of new security partnerships of its own in the region. The emergence of these security partnerships is of potentially great significance, not just for Beijing’s own growing regional influence, but the alignments of other countries such as the United States and the broader regional security architecture.

AfPak File: What Next For Afghanistan After The Intra-Afghan Dialogue In Doha?

On July 7 and 8, several dozen Afghan political figures and civil society members met with Taliban representatives for an intra-Afghan dialogue in Doha, Qatar. The dialogue resulted in a joint statement that laid out a roadmap for peace.

What is the significance of this joint statement, what might it mean for U.S.-Taliban talks, and what might it portend for peace and reconciliation in Afghanistan more broadly? And what are the implications for Afghanistan’s volatile political situation, which includes a presidential election scheduled for the end of September?

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