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Security and Defense

Climate Change Politics in North America: The State of Play

This report contains papers from a two-day conference on Climate Change Politics in North America, organized at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, May 18-19, 2006. The conference papers and participants endeavored to critically examine key aspects and issues of North American politics and policymaking related to climate change. Edited By Henrik Selin and Stacy D. VanDeveer.

Mafia & Co.

Mafia & Co. provides an analytical perspective of the inner workings and expansion of organized crime in three Latin American countries. Juan Carlos Garzon, a Colombian political scientist, provides a comparative investigation looking specifically at criminal networks in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil. Published by Planeta, this book was published in August 2008, with the support of the Fundacion Seguridad y Democracia and the Open Society Institute.

Toward a Society Under Law

Copub.: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Crime continues to undermine the rule of law and democracy in Latin America. The incidence and severity of crime reduce the community's trust in police and in government, and many attempts to address the crime problem have stalled. Directly empowering citizens has, however, been a promising avenue for change.

Crime and Violence in Latin America: Citizen Security, Democracy and the State

Violence and crime pose serious threats to the relatively fragile democracies of the region. This volume offers timely discussion by attorneys, government officials, policy analysts, and academics of the responses of the major actors in Latin America and the world to these threats.  The book focuses on citizen security from a variety of perspectives, examining case studies and offering policy recommendations based on the foregoing analyses.Order this book from Johns Hopkins University Press.

The "Strategic" Partnership Between India and Iran (PDF)

ABSTRACT: India and Iran—one the object of much wooing from Washington, the other a member of President Bush’s “axis of evil” —announced the creation of a “strategic partnership” in 2003. This Special Report explores the new cordiality in relations between New Delhi and Tehran, as well as the ways this partnership may impact upon the interests of other regional players. Christine Fair explains the calculations that make Iran an attractive partner for New Delhi, and concludes that the bilateral relationship is here to stay. Jalil Roshandel offers an Iranian perspective on the relationship.

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