Social Media

Russia Is a Political Hazard Zone

Russia has not seen a protest of this size since 2012 or earlier: on March 26, tens of thousands of people went out into the streets to show their indignation at government corruption. Some 1,500 were detained and dozens prosecuted as a result. Unusually for Russia, protestors in more than 80 cities took part in the events.

An Eye for Blogging

America is losing the digital war against the Islamic State

Two weeks ago in Boston, authorities stopped a disturbed young man before he could launch a terror attack; tragically, last week in Chattanooga, the story ended very differently. Law enforcement officials are scrambling to learn whether clues were missed that could have prevented the rampage and led to the alleged shooter, Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez. But in too many cases, the breadcrumb trail starts with suspicious ones and zeros — with digital propaganda that we still struggle to counter.

Confronting the Internet's Dark Side: Moral and Social Responsibility on the Free Highway

Terrorism, cyberbullying, child pornography, hate speech, cybercrime: along with unprecedented advancements in productivity and engagement, the Internet has ushered in a space for violent, hateful, and antisocial behavior. How do we, as individuals and as a society, protect against dangerous expressions online?

Sarajevo Roses, Tahrir Protests & Djerbahood: Injustice, Youth & Resilience

Within the past quarter century, two tectonic shifts have shaken international affairs: the end of the Cold War in 1991 and the uprisings across the Arab world in 2011. These groundbreaking changes were accompanied by violence and conflict, exemplified by the wars in the former Yugoslavia and state repression across several Arab countries. Dealing with post-conflict and post-authoritarian injustice in these contexts poses a number of challenges.

The Estonia Model: A Conversation With President Toomas Hendrik Ilves on a Free and Secure Internet

The Republic of Estonia built a new government from the ground up, resulting in the world's most comprehensive and efficient “e-government.” Citizens are empowered by a free nationwide Wi-Fi network and a school program that boosts tech competence at every age level. But being an early adopter also has its risks. In 2007, Estonia was one of the first victims of a large-scale cyberattack that mostly targeted government websites and financial services. The attack provided the country's security experts with valuable experience and information in dealing with such incidents.

Crowdsourcing, Citizen Science, and the Law: Legal Issues Affecting Federal Agencies

The federal government operates under certain laws, rules, and policies that differ in significant ways from those that apply to any other institution. Federal agencies must comply with constitutional principles, statutory obligations, regulatory processes, and administrative policies. When new federal activities like crowdsourcing meet rapidly changing technologies, initially unrecognized legal issues may arise that lack precedent and therefore require agency lawyers to scramble to keep up with developments.
 

Who’s Afraid of the Fact-Checker?

The practice of fact-checking politicians’ claims has grown from its initial use by a small group of American journalists to an international movement in journalism with new fact-checking ventures emerging in countries around the globe. Why has fact-checking become such an important part of journalism? How do politicians react to being corrected? How effective are fact-checkers in holding power to account?

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