Society and Culture

Brazil Journal Recounts How a Plan to Save the National Museum Failed

How a Plan to Save the National Museum Failed

The root of the problem: governance.

By Mariana Barbosa, Brazil Journal

 

Approximately 20 years ago, businessman Israel Klabin received an 80 million dollar check from the World Bank to renovate and modernize the National Museum of Brazil. A team of volunteers came together to begin work on an initial project for renovation to be presented to the bank.                

Event Recap: Fears of the Fourth Estate, Current Challenges for the Pakistani Press

Today, we live in a world of increasing democratic backsliding and attacks on free speech are not uncommon. Pakistan is no different–print or media journalists who are perceived to have crossed certain red-lines can face censorship and intimidation while the media houses that employ them could be financially undercut. As the Pakistani state cracks down on the mainstream media, social media has become a bastion of critical voices, but now the Pakistani authorities have turned their attention to social media and bloggers are facing similar consequences.

Traditional Populations, Land Rights, and Environmental Justice: The Challenges of the Amazon

The concept of environmentalism has changed over time. Initially focused on flora and fauna, conservation efforts increasingly strive to include the populations who have traditionally inhabited these lands. The change was partially prompted by criticism of traditional conservation strategies, which tend to follow Yellowstone’s top-down approach to conservation that favors extremely limited land use by local populations.

Central Asian Cinema Series: Islomkhodja

The Kennan Institute, in partnership with George Washington University's Central Asia Program, is pleased to present the US premiere of Islomkhodja (Islomxo’ja 2018) as the inaugural film of its Central Asian Cinema Series. The film will be followed by a discussion with the director, Jakhongir Akhmedov.

 

The First Crisis for Pakistan’s New Government

One month into its term, Pakistan’s new government has experienced its first crisis.

It’s not about economics, even though many analysts had predicted that worsening balance of payments problems would constitute the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI)-led administration’s first test. Nor does it have anything to do with foreign affairs, even as Pakistan’s relations with Washington and with its Indian and Afghan neighbors continue to struggle.

Instead, it revolves around a personnel decision.

Polish Controversies and Legislation on the Holocaust

This event is co-sponsored by the History and Public Policy Program and the Rabin Chair Forum at George Washington University.

A Preliminary Study of PRC Political Influence and Interference Activities in American Higher Education

U.S. colleges and universities create knowledge—and promote American well-being—through their exercise of academic freedom and openness. Openness demands that American universities admit the world’s best students, many of whom are Chinese. Academic freedom requires that all scholars in the United States respect principles of free inquiry and critical discourse, regardless of their countries of origin.

Fears of the Fourth Estate: Current Challenges for the Pakistani Press

In recent months—and particularly in the weeks leading up to Pakistan’s July election—journalists, activists, and analysts have expressed concerns about growing threats to the Pakistani press. This event will feature a discussion of the current media environment in Pakistan. It will include the launch of a new Committee to Protect Journalists report and accompanying documentary, which is entitled “Acts of Intimidation: In Pakistan, Journalists’ Fear and Censorship Grow Even as Fatal Violence Declines.” How has Pakistan’s media climate and its challenges evolved over the years?

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