Society and Culture | Wilson Center

Society and Culture

Gender and Islam in Africa: Rights, Sexuality, and Law

Gender and Islam in Africa examines ways in which women in Africa are interpreting traditional Islamic concepts in order to empower themselves and their societies. African women, it argues, have promoted the ideals and practices of equality, human rights, and democracy within the framework of Islamic thought, challenging conventional conceptualizations of the religion as gender-constricted and patriarchal.

Deforestation, Population, and Development in a Warming World: A Roundtable on Latin America

"Rural development and MCH [maternal child health] in the most remote, rural areas are going to largely explain the future of Latin American conservation, development, population, and urbanization," said David Lopez-Carr, associate professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara."

Inuit Images: Prints from the Canadian Arctic

October 26, 2012 to January 31, 2013
Wilson Center, 4th floor

This is a special exhibition to coincide with the 18th Inuit Studies Conference at the Smithsonian Institution, October 24-28, 2012 with prints from Cape Dorset, Pangnirtung, Baker Lake, Igloolik, Ulukhaktok.

Orange Revolution and Aftermath: Mobilization, Apathy, and the State in Ukraine

In 2004, hundreds of thousands of Ukranian protestors mobilized in the streets of Kyiv against authoritarian rulers who had clearly falsified the Fall elections. The size and efficacy of the Orange Revolution, as the protest became known, surprised political observers—and even the participants themselves. In the aftermath, many observers concluded that civil society, long thought dead in Ukraine, was alive and well.

Mexico's Democratic Challenges: Politics, Government, and Society

Only a decade ago, Mexico saw the end of seventy years of single-party hegemonic rule and the first free and fair election in its history. How has the country evolved since then, and what is the status of its democracy today? In this comprehensive new collection intended for use in undergraduate courses a group of distinguished scholars examines recent political developments in Mexico—including its 2006 election and the breakdown in consensus that nearly resulted—in order to assess the progress of its democratization.

Participatory Innovation and Representative Democracy in Latin America

This empirically grounded collection examines the growth of participatory institutions in Latin American democracy and how such institutions affect representative government. While most existing literature concentrates on model cases of participatory budgeting in Brazil, this volume investigates cases in Mexico, Bolivia, Chile, Brazil, and Argentina, where conditions for innovation have been far less favorable.

Cities after the Fall of Communism: Reshaping Cultural Landscapes and European Identity

Cities after the Fall of Communism traces the cultural reorientation of East European cities since 1989. Analyzing the architecture, commemorative practices, and urban planning of cities such as Lviv, Vilnius, and Odessa, the contributors to this volume demonstrate how history may be selectively re-imagined in light of present political and cultural realities.

One Homeland or Two? The Nationalization and Transnationalization of Mongolia's Kazakhs

How do ethnicity and notions of a traditional homeland interact in shaping a community’s values and images? As Alexander C. Diener shows in One Homeland or Two?, the answer, even in a diaspora, is far from a simple harking back to the “old country.”

Migration, Homeland, and Belonging in Eurasia

Migration, a force throughout the world, has special meanings in the former Soviet lands. Soviet successor countries, each with strong ethnic associations, have pushed some racial groups out and pulled others back home. Forcible relocations of the Stalin era were reversed, and areas previously closed for security reasons were opened to newcomers. These countries represent a fascinating mix of the motivations and achievements of migration in Russia and Central Asia.

Consumption and Social Change in a Post-Soviet Middle Class

What happens when your once-dignified profession no longer supports a dignified lifestyle? In 1990s St. Petersburg, teachers had to find out the hard way; although the institutions and ideologies of Soviet life situated them as "cultured" consumers, contemporary processes of marketization and privatization left them unable to attain what they now considered to be respectable material standards of living.

Pages