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Terrorism

Break all the Borders: Separatism and the Reshaping of the Middle East

Since 2011, civil wars and state failure have wracked the Arab world, underlying the misalignment between national identity and political borders. In Break all the Borders, Ariel I. Ahram examines the separatist movements that aimed to remake those borders and create new independent states.

AfPak File: What Next For Afghanistan After The Intra-Afghan Dialogue In Doha?

On July 7 and 8, several dozen Afghan political figures and civil society members met with Taliban representatives for an intra-Afghan dialogue in Doha, Qatar. The dialogue resulted in a joint statement that laid out a roadmap for peace.

What is the significance of this joint statement, what might it mean for U.S.-Taliban talks, and what might it portend for peace and reconciliation in Afghanistan more broadly? And what are the implications for Afghanistan’s volatile political situation, which includes a presidential election scheduled for the end of September?

Double Jeopardy: Combating Nuclear Terror and Climate Change

As the consequences of climate change grow ever more dire, it seems imperative that we use every alternative to carbon-based fuels—but does this include nuclear energy? 
 

An Obscure Organization with Outsize Importance

Last week in Orlando, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) convened one of its regular meetings.

FATF is not exactly a household name, and not surprisingly its meeting garnered relatively little global media attention. And yet the organization plays a significant global role—and particularly with regards to Pakistan.

AfPak File: Assessing Afghanistan’s Recent Jirga

Last week, Afghanistan held a loya jirga to discuss possible ways forward in peace and reconciliation efforts. More than 3000 people attended the event, which yielded a 23-point resolution outlining a number of priorities, including a ceasefire.

However, many political opponents of Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, who organized the event, refused to attend. The Taliban, which also did not attend, rejected the idea of a ceasefire.

Thinking Through the Unthinkable in Sri Lanka

More than a week after the Easter Sunday massacre in Sri Lanka, a devastatingly well-coordinated assault that targeted churches and hotels around the country, the shock still lingers.

It was by far the deadliest attack to strike Sri Lanka since the dark days of its brutal 26-year civil war, which ended in 2009. And it shattered the relative stability that had prevailed in the country in the subsequent decade.

Afpak File Podcast: Trilateral Tensions And Implications For Talks With The Taliban

In recent weeks, the fragile U.S.-Pakistan-Afghanistan triangle has suffered some body blows. First, Afghan national security adviser Hamdullah Mohib excoriated lead U.S. negotiator Zalmay Khalilzad, accusing him of trying to delegitimize the Afghan government.

Then, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan publicly endorsed the idea of an interim government in Afghanistan. An incensed Kabul accused Khan of interfering in Afghan affairs, and the U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan expressed his displeasure as well.

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