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Trade and Development

The Strategic Triangle: France, Germany, and the United States in the Shaping of the New Europe

France is Germany’s most important partner in the process of European integration. The United States was long Germany’s protector but now is the power balancing Germany’s in Europe. And the Franco-American relationship, though less prominent than the other two, has a great impact on both of them.

Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of Economic Competitiveness

Collaboration between the public and private sectors helped the U.S. economy recover from its last period of economic malaise, and similar collaboration is needed today, according to a key participant in the 1980s–1990s competitiveness movement.

Islamization and the Pakistani Economy

Pakistan is the second most populous Muslim-majority country in the world, and within a few decades will be the world’s fifth largest country. It is located at the strategic crossroads of Asia and the Middle East, and is adjacent to the Middle East’s vast oil fields and to some of the globe’s most sensitive sea lanes. It is an acknowledged nuclear weapons state. It is a key player in the global war against terrorism, and itself a victim of terrorism. It has also been accused of fomenting terrorist activities, and providing refuge to remnants of al Qaeda and the Taliban.

The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know

As we move further into a new century, the two most populous nations on earth, India and China, continue a long and tangled relationship. Given their contested border, their nuclear rivalry, their competition for influence in Asia, their growing economic relations, and their internal problems, interaction between these two powers will deeply affect not only stability and prosperity in the region, but also vital U.S. interests. Yet the dynamics of the Chinese-Indian relationship are little known to Americans.

The Strategic Dynamics of Latin American Trade

The diversity of Latin American trade agreements established since the mid-1980s reflects a broadening range of strategic perceptions and orientations. The argument of this volume is that this increasing divergence among the arrangements reflects fundamental and growing differences among their broader strategic perceptions and political and economic objectives. These, in turn, are grounded in each country’s economic profile, the institutional configuration of its trade policy process, and the constraints and opportunities policymakers perceive at the domestic and international levels.

Reflections of His Excellency Paul Kagame on the Tenth Anniversary of the Genocide in Rwanda

On April 21, 2004, His Excellency Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda, reflected on the tenth anniversary of the tragic genocide in Rwanda.  He discussed the root causes of the genocide, the international reaction to the crisis, and the measures that he and his country have been taking to rebuild Rwanda. His presentation was part of Remembering Rwanda, a commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the genocide. The program was co-sponsored by the Africa Program, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the United States Institute of Peace.

Russian-Eurasian Renaissance? U.S. Trade and Investment in Russia and Eurasia

The book begins by examining the overall trade and investment outlook in Russia and Eurasia. It then takes up critical sectors: energy, aerospace, automobiles, agriculture, and telecommunications. It turns to current institutional impediments to trade and investment such as problems in corporate governance, the banking system, and the rule of law. The final chapters look to the future and assess the prospects for economic reform, the movement to join the World Trade Organization, and the impact of political dynamics in the region.

Replicating Microfinance in the United States

Microfinance was pioneered in the developing world as the lending of small amounts of money to entrepreneurs who lacked the kinds of credentials and collateral demanded by banks. Similar practices spread from the developing to the developed world, reversing the usual direction of innovation, and today several hundred microfinance institutions are operating in the United States.

Economic Cold War: America's Embargo against China and the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1949-1963

Why would one country impose economic sanctions against another in pursuit of foreign policy objectives? How effective is the use of economic weapons in attaining such objectives? To answer these questions, the author examines how and why the United States and its allies instituted economic sanctions against the People’s Republic of China in the 1950s, and how the embargo affected Chinese domestic policy and the Sino-Soviet alliance.

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