Trade and Development

Is Deterrence Enough? Deterrence Policies in Mexico, and Finding a Way Forward in the U.S.-Mexico Bilateral Relationship on Migration

Deterrence strategies, such as deportation and detention, are a component of the United States and Mexico’s bilateral strategy to manage migratory flows from Central America. While deterrence strategies have had some success in the United States in deterring migrants from Mexico, there is little evidence to show that they have effectively reduced the rates of migration from the Northern Triangle.

AfPak File Podcast: Pakistan's Economy Under Imran Khan

Pakistan’s new government, which took office in August, has inherited a series of urgent economic challenges. These include plunging foreign reserves, a balance of payments crisis, and water and energy shortages. The new administration, led by cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan, will need to move quickly.

Can Pakistan Experience an Era of Change?

Pakistan’s new government has promised to shake things up.

Elected in July and led by cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan and his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party (PTI), the new administration has vowed to do away with business as usual. The PTI projects itself as something different—a clean party not led by a family dynasty—and insists it will run the country differently from previous government as well.

Infographic | The USMCA

Between Free Trade and 'America First': Analyzing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

After a two-year period of uncertainty on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the United States Mexico and Canada reached a new deal on the U.S. self-imposed deadline of September 30. The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is now pending approval from each country’s legislature. If approved, what potential results will come from the agreement?

The Wilson Center’s Canada and Mexico Institutes hosted a discussion on the beginning of a new era in North America’s trade relations.

New NAFTA Will End the Tyranny of Uncertainty if Approved

The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a welcome step.

If approved by each country’s legislature, the agreement will dissolve the uncertainty that has hovered over North America’s commercial and production networks for the last two years. A new rules-based agreement can be a major plus for the 1.2 trillion dollar continental market. 

It is very important now, however, to have good assessments of the potential results that will flow from the agreement. While President Trump lauds the potential job creation, others characterize the agreement as a mixed bag.

AMLO and the Outlook for North American Free Trade

After thirteen months of intense negotiations, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced they had reached a new trade deal on September 30, 2018. The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, is set to replace the 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement.

The Mexico Institute hosted Jesús Seade, Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador's chief NAFTA negotiator, for a conversation on the outlook for trade in North America under Mexico's new administration.

When Argentina Catches a Cold: Uruguay Gets New Trading Partners

Former Uruguayan President José Mujica once observed that Uruguay and Argentina “are not brother countries, we’re twins.” Their connections – from mate and tango to ranching and a distinctive accent – are historic and well-known. But after Argentina’s catastrophic default in 2001 and devaluation in 2002 bludgeoned Uruguay’s economy, a consensus emerged that the country needed to disentangle itself from Argentina’s crisis-prone economy.

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