Trade and Development

Facing Chinese Aggression and U.S. Indifference, Few Options Exist for Canada

Originally published in iPolitics on April 4, 2019.

Trump Threatens to Put Tariffs on Cars Coming from Mexico

"Imposing tariffs on cars for this reason would be a huge violation of existing trade rules. What’s more it would be immensely costly for US auto producers and consumers. It’s difficult to see this as a credible threat. The Mexican government will surely view this threat with some skepticism as well as frustration after making significant concessions to Trump on migration last week."

- Duncan Wood 

 

The Workforce Challenge to MENA Youth

The Middle East is experiencing a renewed wave of unrest, but what are the fundamental economic and social undercurrents driving people into the streets? Join us and our expert panel to discuss the intersecting challenges facing Middle Eastern youth: a growing youth bulge, chronic unemployment, outdated education models, impeded business growth, and the impacts of regional conflict.

Preparing for the Unpredictable: The ADB and Natural Disasters, Trade Disputes

In its latest annual report on regional growth prospects, the Asian Development Bank focuses on the impact of natural disasters and ensuring resilience. Join us for a discussion on the causes of disasters, how insurance systems and other market mechanisms could impact risks, and the role of government including infrastructure development and recovery assistance.

Get USMCA Done to Preserve Over 30 Years of Prosperity

The United States, Mexico and Canada have forged a massive commercial relationship over the past three decades.

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) significantly reorientated all three economies. Businesses and farmers built mutually beneficial co-production networks that enabled them to compete successfully against other global trading powers.

The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (USMCA) preserves economic advances wrought since NAFTA came into effect in 1994.

The China-U.S. Trade War: Lessons from History

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW, we are joined by Wilson Fellow Felix Boecking, who discusses the unintended consequences of protectionism and the difficulties of strategizing trade wars with a focus on specific examples from China in the early 20th century.  He also highlights his recent book, No Great Wall: Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927-1945.

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Event Transcript: Powering Brazil - The Outlook for Brazil's Energy and Mining Sectors, with Minister Bento Albuquerque

On March 7, 2019, Brazil’s Minister of Mines and Energy Bento Albuquerque spoke at the Wilson Center on the outlook for Brazil’s energy and mining sectors under the new administration.

The Minister was candid in his recognition of the challenges ahead for Brazil, but assured that the government remains committed to strengthening governance and improving the legal and regulatory processes in the mining and energy sectors: work that has been given new urgency following the devastating collapse of the tailings mine in Brumadinho in February 2019.

The Dangerous Business of Defining Trade Threats

It’s been just over three decades since members of Congress smashed a Toshiba boombox with great fanfare on the footsteps of Capitol Hill in protest against the flood of Japanese exports into the United States. The visual of three Congressmen and women wielding sledgehammers made clear the U.S. legislators’ wrath against the ever-growing trade imbalance between Japan and the United States at the height of the trade war in 1987.

Navigating China and the U.S.: A Conversation with Prime Minister José Ulisses de Pina Correia e Silva of Cabo Verde

On March 25, 2019, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Africa Program, in collaboration with the Wilson Center Africa Program, welcomed the Prime Minister of the Republic of Cabo Verde, José Ulisses de Pina Correia e Silva, to CSIS’ offices in Washington, D.C. for a discussion around Cabo Verde’s bilateral relations, particularly with China, and how the U.S. can support the country’s interests.

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