Trade and Development

Infographic | The USMCA

Between Free Trade and 'America First': Analyzing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

After a two-year period of uncertainty on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the United States Mexico and Canada reached a new deal on the U.S. self-imposed deadline of September 30. The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is now pending approval from each country’s legislature. If approved, what potential results will come from the agreement?

The Wilson Center’s Canada and Mexico Institutes hosted a discussion on the beginning of a new era in North America’s trade relations.

New NAFTA Will End the Tyranny of Uncertainty if Approved

The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a welcome step.

If approved by each country’s legislature, the agreement will dissolve the uncertainty that has hovered over North America’s commercial and production networks for the last two years. A new rules-based agreement can be a major plus for the 1.2 trillion dollar continental market. 

It is very important now, however, to have good assessments of the potential results that will flow from the agreement. While President Trump lauds the potential job creation, others characterize the agreement as a mixed bag.

AMLO and the Outlook for North American Free Trade

After thirteen months of intense negotiations, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced they had reached a new trade deal on September 30, 2018. The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, is set to replace the 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement.

The Mexico Institute hosted Jesús Seade, Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador's chief NAFTA negotiator, for a conversation on the outlook for trade in North America under Mexico's new administration.

When Argentina Catches a Cold: Uruguay Gets New Trading Partners

Former Uruguayan President José Mujica once observed that Uruguay and Argentina “are not brother countries, we’re twins.” Their connections – from mate and tango to ranching and a distinctive accent – are historic and well-known. But after Argentina’s catastrophic default in 2001 and devaluation in 2002 bludgeoned Uruguay’s economy, a consensus emerged that the country needed to disentangle itself from Argentina’s crisis-prone economy.

Can the Indo-Pacific Open Doors for Taiwan?

Beijing’s campaign to squeeze Taiwan’s international space has shown no signs of letting down, and has actually been intensifying this year. The pressure has been particularly relentless on the economic front. A slew of Latin American nations have opted to pursue diplomatic relations with the PRC rather than the ROC, ostensibly for economic gain, while multinational corporations have been confronted with Beijing’s pressure to label Taiwan as part of the PRC.

Mexico and China

After four decades of extraordinary transformation, no one can doubt the enormous ambitions of China as a world power, now aided and abetted by the retreat launched by Trump, leaving it fertile ground for its political and strategic, as well as its economic, expansion.

Wilson Quarterly Spotlight: NAFTA and Tariffs Beyond the Numbers

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW, we explore the newly released issue of The Wilson Quarterly, “The Grinding Gears of North America,” with the help of editor Richard Solash and contributor Laura Dawson. They discuss how the uncertain fate of NAFTA and President Trump’s trade wars are testing the bonds of the North American continent. 

The Future of the Quad is in Southeast Asia

Much has already been made of the so-called “Quad” mechanism linking Japan, India, Australia, and the United States, which was announced during President Trump’s November 2017 trip to Asia.

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