Trans-Pacific Partnership | Wilson Center

Trans-Pacific Partnership

The Ambiguous U.S.-Japan Trade Deal, Lost in Translation

At first blush, Japan and United States succeeded in paving the way to reach a much-anticipated bilateral trade deal on the sidelines of the latest G7 summit. Both Prime Minister Abe and President Trump could seemingly claim a victory and both countries could look forward to signing a final, win-win agreement by late September.

What To Look For in 2019: The Year Ahead in Asia

America In Search of an Asia Strategy

Event Recap: Japan's Leadership Role in the International Order

How is Japan navigating changes in global trade and its evolving economic relations with the United States, as well as the domestic expectations for Japan on the international stage? Those were the issues of focus at an event held in collaboration with the Social Science Research Council’s New Voice from Japan initiative, which seeks to introduce young and upcoming scholars in Japan to the world and tries to involve academics in the policy process.

Japan Accelerates Its Hedging Strategy

It is natural for countries to feel anxious when their security depends on the commitments of an ally. This is why a critical part of American foreign policy since the end of the Second World War has been to reassure its allies in Europe and Asia alike that its commitment to their defense was rock-solid. History has also demonstrated that allies, when less certain about Washington’s security guarantee, begin to look elsewhere.

U.S. Trade, North Korea Policies Bring Asia’s Biggest Economies to Table

North Korea continues to dominate the headlines as all eyes are now on Kim Jong-un’s upcoming meeting with President Donald Trump. But while Pyongyang’s overtures to the outside world have repercussions for peace far beyond East Asia, there is also another significant development in the region that has not garnered as much media attention as what is happening in the Korean Peninsula, but is at least as significant for the region in the longer term. 

Southeast Asia’s Balancing Act

It has been said so often that it has become a trope. Broadly speaking, the nations of Southeast Asia do not want to be forced to choose between China and the United States. The logic of this is straightforward–good relations with each great power offers unique benefits, and those in Southeast Asia would prefer to enjoy those benefits without risk or cost. Yet a closer analysis of dynamics in Southeast Asia, especially in the past 12 months, suggests a far more complex–and for the United States, troubling–dynamic is at play.
 

Return of the TPP: Trump Realizing Trade Deal Aligns with Goals on China

Last week, President Trump asked his trade team to look at rejoining the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), now known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). President Trump pulled out of TPP in January 2017, after sharply criticizing it.

By leaving the trade agreement, the U.S. forfeited strategic advantages and economic benefits. It gave up leadership of a group of 11 growing and friendly economies in one of the world’s most dynamic economic regions, where China is asserting its economic prowess.

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