Trans-Pacific Partnership

The Future of Global Trade under CPTPP

On his first day in office, President Donald Trump formally withdrew the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement that had been championed by his predecessor.  Just over one year later, the leaders of the eleven countries left behind by this decision gathered in Santiago, Chile to commit to a partnership of their own dubbed the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) or TPP 11.

TPP, Revised and Reborn

Where does the United States now stand on TPP with the signing by eleven nations of the revised Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership? Shihoko Goto, Senior Northeast Asia Associate with the Wilson Center’s Asia Program, provides analysis in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

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Infographic | The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership

U.S. Trade Policy in Northeast Asia

Economic openness and globalization are seen to hurt U.S. jobs and industrial competitiveness, according to the ideas supporting the White House’s “America First” policy.

The Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership: Implications for Global Trade

On March 8, representatives of eleven countries will meet in Chile to sign the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), creating a massive free trade bloc connecting 500 million people and economies with a combined GDP of over $10 trillion. Signatories include Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam.

The current agreement includes several major economies that will have a profound influence on the future of global trade and investment. The United States withdrew from negotiations in January 2017.

In Trade, Getting to Yes is Not a Surrender

In his State of the Union address last month, President Trump declared that “the era of economic surrender is over.” That combative stance seemed an ominous beginning to outlining a protectionist U.S. trade stance. Surprisingly, though, he didn't mention any specific trade agreement by name, nor did he suggest ripping up existing ones. That’s still cold comfort at a time when anxieties about major disruptions in international trading patterns being one of the biggest risks to disrupt growth remain strong.

Ringing in 2018 with the Indo-Pacific in Mind

Can the Indo-Pacific strategy be more than a slogan and actually become a policy goal? That’s certainly a challenge Japan is willing to take on in 2018. While the country officially rings in the new year over the course of three days, that tradition didn’t stop Foreign Minister Taro Kono from curtailing his vacation for a three-day tour of three countries bordering the Indian Ocean to bolster Tokyo’s clout as an Asian leader.

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