Urban Studies | Wilson Center

Urban Studies

Religion and the Encounter with Modernity: What Can We Learn from Jewish Urbanization?

We live in an era in which global terrorism wraps itself in theology. Religious groups that employ the language of ancient scriptures often do so using cell phones and YouTube videos. How are we to understand this seeming discrepancy? This talk uses the case of Jewish urbanization in the nineteenth century to discuss some of the ways religious leaders and communities engage with the fear and possibility presented by modernity. What are the political implications for theological and cultural nostalgia? Can we understand why some responses are more violent than others?

Urban Violence: Building Safe and Inclusive Cities in Latin America

Join us for a panel discussion on policy options for building safe and inclusive cities in Latin America based on recent field research conducted in several major urban areas in the region.

Welcoming Remarks:

Cynthia J. Arnson, Director, Latin American Program, Woodrow Wilson Center

Introduction:

Eric Hershberg, Director, Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, American University

Panelists:

Where Does Baltimore Go From Here?

As calm begins to return to Baltimore many long standing issues remain. They were not resolved during decades of decline and they are not likely going to be resolved in the short term. We asked Blair Ruble, Vice President for Programs and Director, Urban Sustainability Laboratory at the Wilson Center how the community can begin to move forward.

Promoting Diversity in Our Nation’s Think Tanks: Which Way Forward?

The Urban Institute, The Wilson Center, and UC Riverside School of Public Policy are pleased to host an important conversation on how best to improve diversity in our nation’s think tanks. We will discuss the problem of lack of gender and racial diversity in research and leadership positions. And we will discuss concrete solutions—either those already underway, or additional strategies that need to be crafted and deployed.

After Baltimore, we must see community as a process

Baltimore became my refuge when I moved to the District four decades ago. As a native New Yorker, I could not quite adjust to overly conformist official and bureaucratic life in a nation’s capital. Charm City’s quirky citizens just an hour away offered a much appreciated escape. Working-class Baltimore was the opposite of Washington, blues singer Leadbelly’s quintessential “Bourgeois town.” Watching Baltimore’s torment unfold in recent days has broken my heart.

After Baltimore, we must see community as a process

Baltimore became my refuge when I moved to the District four decades ago. As a native New Yorker, I could not quite adjust to overly conformist official and bureaucratic life in a nation’s capital. Charm City’s quirky citizens just an hour away offered a much appreciated escape. Working-class Baltimore was the opposite of Washington, blues singer Leadbelly’s quintessential “Bourgeois town.” Watching Baltimore’s torment unfold in recent days has broken my heart.

Misty Copeland to Dance Swan Lake at DC’s Kennedy Center

History will be made at the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater on the e

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