Urban Studies | Wilson Center

Urban Studies

Concepts of Immigration and Integration in Urban Areas

Despite attempts by industrialized countries to control the inflow of migrants, millions of people make their way to these regions every year. Historically, immigrants have settled in urban areas, seeking to capitalize on the economic opportunities cities offer. Current trends appear to be no different, although immigrants may be seeking smaller cities or moving away from the "classical" immigrant magnet cities. Either way, adjusting to a new city is no easy task.

Separate Cities: Poverty, Growth, and Inequality in Urban Areas

Over the next twenty years, most developing countries will become more urban than rural. Demographic trends indicate that poverty is also increasing in cities in the developing world. While regional economic growth trends have been positive in recent years, a troubling pattern of increasing poverty and inequality in cities remains. Poverty reduction always has been a principal goal of development efforts; but urban poverty is particularly complex since it represents a dual burden for local governments.

Concepts of Immigration and Integration in Urban Areas

Despite attempts to control the inflow of migrants, millions of people make their way to cities every year. Historically, immigrants have settled in urban areas, seeking to capitalize on the economic opportunities cities offer. On January 28th, the Comparative Urban Studies Project sponsored a seminar, Concepts of Immigration and Integration in Urban Areas.

Towards a Stable State: Urban Revitilization in the Americas, Quito, Ecuador

On December 16 and 17, 2005 the Comparative Urban Studies Project and FLACSO, Ecuador organized a two-day forum, Towards a Stable State: Urban Revitalization in the Americas in Quito, Ecuador. This forum, sponsored by the Urban Programs Team of USAID, explored issues of urban identity, governance, and revitalization in order to examine the role local government and civil society can play to encourage a more comprehensive and effective approach to urban development and national stability.

The Role of the City in State Stability

Sustained economic and social development and democratic governance are impossible within the framework of a failed state. Conditions of instability and insecurity that arise from terrorism, organized crime, pandemic disease, and extreme poverty cannot be overcome without a functioning state. Policies to fix failed states must begin with an understanding of how to fix failing cities.

Forum on Urban Infrastructure and Public Service Delivery for the Urban Poor -- Event Location: India Habitat Center, NEW DELHI, India

On June 24-25, the Comparative Urban Studies Project, along with the National Institute for Urban Affairs, brought together experts for a two-day forum to discuss basic service delivery and infrastructure for the urban poor in Asia. The meeting was held at the India Habitat Center in New Delhi, India. The forum focused on how the urban poor in cities and towns can have access to safe, reliable, and affordable infrastructure and urban services.

Book Launch - Culture and Public Action

On Thursday, May 20, 2004, the Comparative Urban Studies Project hosted a book launch for Culture and Public Action. Led by distinguished anthropologists and economists, this book argues that culture is central to development, and presents a framework for incorporating culture into development discourse. The editors, Vijayendra Rao and Michael Walton provided an overview of the book's theoretical underpinnings and conclusions.

Concepts of Immigration and Integration in Urban Areas

Despite attempts to control the inflow of migrants, millions of people make their way to cities every year. Historically, immigrants have settled in urban areas, seeking to capitalize on the economic opportunities cities offer. On April 30, the Comparative Urban Studies Project sponsored a seminar, Concepts of Immigration and Integration in Urban Areas.

Health Crisis: HIV/AIDS in Developing World Cities

On February 23, the Comparative Urban Studies Project, along with the Environmental Change and Security Project, brought together seven practitioners from lenders and NGOs to discuss the status of community-based initiatives to fight HIV/AIDS in developing world cities.

Decentralization and the Politics of Urban Development in West Africa--- Event Location: Hotel Ngor Diarama, Dakar Senegal

Urbanization is one of the most powerful, and insistent, emerging realities of the early 21st century. While developed countries have been largely urbanized for a long time, developing regions are quickly narrowing the gap. Africa, one of the least urbanized continents of the world, is urbanizing rapidly. Thus, in the year 2000 Africa's total population (estimated at 794 million) was 37.2 percent urbanized – the lowest of any major continental region of the world.

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