Urban Studies | Wilson Center

Urban Studies

Immigration and Integration in Urban Communities: Renegotiating the City

In nations across the globe, immigration policies have abandoned strategies of multiculturalism in favor of a “play the game by our rules or leave” mentality. Immigration and Integration in Urban Communities shows how immigrants negotiate with longtime residents over economic, political, cultural, and linguistic boundaries. Host communities are neither as static, nor migrants as passive, as assimilationist policies would suggest.

Immigration and Integration in Urban Communities: Renegotiating the City (2008)

Edited by Lisa M. Hanley and Blair A. Ruble, and Allison M. Garland

Read more about the book here.

The Inclusive City: Infrastructure and Public Services for the Urban Poor in Asia

Getting basic services—housing, transportation, trash disposal, water, and sanitation—poses almost unimaginable challenges to the urban poor of Asia. The Inclusive City provides case studies of how governmental programs attempt to meet these challenges by directly involving the poor themselves in improving their access to urban services through collaborative efforts. Case studies are drawn from the largest cities in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, China (including Hong Kong), Indonesia, and the Philippines.

Kapital Rozmaiitosty: Transnatsionalni Migranty v Monreali, Vashingtoni ta Kyievi [Creating Diversity Capital: Transnational Migrants in Montreal, Washington, and Kyiv] (2007)

Translated by Taras Tsymbal. No digital form available at this time. Please contact the Kennan Kyiv Project if you would like to obtain a copy: kennan@kennan.kiev.ua. For English-Language version look here.

Toward a Society under Law: Citizens and Their Police in Latin America

Crime continues to undermine the rule of law and democracy in Latin America. The incidence and severity of crime reduce the community’s trust in police and in government, and many attempts to address the crime problem have stalled. Directly empowering citizens has, however, been a promising avenue for change. Toward a Society under Law focuses on community policing and on police reform.

Creating Diversity Capital: Transnational Migrants in Montreal, Washington, and Kyiv

How do urban communities accommodate this century’s massive transnational migrations? This volume seeks clues about how a city’s capacity for urban social sustainability, termed "diversity capital," may expand under such conditions.

Beyond Metropolis: The Planning and Governance of Asia's Mega-Urban Regions

Beyond Metropolis studies planning and governance in the regions surrounding the twelve cities in Asia with populations over ten million: Tokyo, Mumbai, Kolkata, Dhaka, Delhi, Shanghai, Jakarta, Osaka, Beijing, Karachi, Metro Manila, and Seoul. These regions are greater than cities plus suburbs: for almost all, development has sprawled into the surrounding countryside, enveloping villages, towns, and small and medium-sized cities, creating “extended metropolitan regions.”

Popular Political Support in Urban China

Has the current political system in the People’s Republic of China lost its legitimacy in the eyes of the Chinese public? On the basis of three carefully drawn surveys of Beijing residents between 1995 and 1999, the author finds that diffuse support for the current political system—based on attitudes toward institutions and values—remains strong, at least among city-dwellers, though it is gradually declining.

Commerce in Russian Urban Culture, 1861-1914

Tsarist Russia’s commercial class is today receiving serious attention from both Russian and non-Russian historians. This book is a contribution to that literature. Commerce in Russian Urban Culture, 1861–1914 examines the relation between the entrepreneurial world, especially business and banking, and the cultural milieu of Russia. Going beyond the commercial-cultural connection of charitable activity, the contributors to this collaborative project also study cultural activity undertaken by enterprises for their own purposes, notably bank and commercial architecture.

The Breakdown of Class Politics: A Debate on Post-Industrial Stratification

Class and its linkage to politics became a controversial and exciting topic again in the 1990s. Terry Clark and Seymour Martin Lipset published “Are Social Classes Dying?” in 1991, which sparked a lively debate and much new research. The main critics of Clark and Lipset—at Oxford and Berkeley—held (initially) that class was more persistent than Clark and Lipset suggested. The positions were sharply opposed and involved several conceptual and methodological concerns. But the issues grew more nuanced as further reflections and evidence accumulated.

Pages